#clmooc Light Connections

 

inspiration_flamingtext What could we do for Light? How about neon poetry?  Ask, and the challenge is accepted . That is the spirit of #clmooc 

 

Here is our finished collaboration with poets

Sheri Edwards
Kevin Hodgson
Susan Watson
Terry Elliott
Mary Ellen B
Andrew Stein/Michelle

 
My don’t we shine!
 

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#clmooc #middleschool Inspiration

 

inspiration_flamingtext

Inspiration is all around. One place is #clmooc. That is a Connected Learning Massive Open Online Collaboration. I was involved as a participant and as part of the support team. Read about my #clmooc experience and learn about Connected Learning. It really isn’t anything new — except in how we are connected. Not through snail mail pen pals, not through TV news, not by traveling places. Although all those are available, in today’s world, we connect online through Google Hangouts, online communities like the clmooc Google Plus community, through social media, and through blogs, tweets, photo apps, etc. I can be connected right now to my friends around the world with a click of my mouse. That’s what has changed. That means we can pursue our interests, with peers around the world, for shared purposes, to learn academic goals, in an openly networked community to create products of interest for personal or societal reasons.

So education has changed, and I’m ready.

I’m ready and supported and inspired by my clmooc Google Plus community and my Twitter PLN, as I reciprocate the collaboration. I thank my CLMOOC connections and Twitter PLN for reaching out and connecting as peers in this networked world.

Some of the middle school educators have started a community of our own: Connect in the Middle at MightyBell. We’ve started small circles to plan and implement curriculum on Social JusticeePortfolios, and Connect2Learn, a collaborative blog for student writing prompts.

If you work with middle school students, please consider joining Connect in the Middle. Librarians, principals, teachers, etc. Join and add to our collaborative spirit; get inspired and connected, ready to help your students become Connected Learners.

See you there!

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#clmooc #light #constellation collaboration

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Chief Astronaut: Kevin Hodgson

In Week 5, our challenge was light. How do we make and write with light? Under the inspiration of Kevin Hodgson , we were invited to remake the night sky with our own constellations and stories. How? He created directions, and let our imaginations take us to find in our #clmooc sky, the stars and stories hidden inside our own worlds. Click on the Star Sky Chart above to enjoy the constellation stories created by us.

Listen to the sounds of our space, courtesy of Kevin: G+Post. Kevin’s Post. Sound Cloud Audio.

Remember who we are.

We are stardust
Billion year old carbon
We are golden   …..   Joni Mitchell  on Rock.Genius

I think this is my favorite Make of all the #clmooc cycles. It brought people together with different tools. Problems arose and people hacked the solutions. For example, the story length was an issue, so members wrote blog posts of their stories. We were challenged, we were interested, we helped each other, and we created a sky worth viewing.  It brought us to places in memories and imaginings that we shared, like Jennifer Sharpe’s snowstorm and my Three Brown Dots. Thanks you Kevin.!

CLMOOC StarChart Complete

constellationThreeBrownDots

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#clmooc enLighten Us

As we share the light and the dark, the shine and the shadow, so we reveal the world.

This we discuss in our Voxer chats.  Perhaps you’d like to join us, thanks to Mary Morgan Ryan !

 


The Tapestry

 

Puddles

. . . imagine a puddle waking up one morning and thinking, ‘This is an interesting world I find myself in, an interesting hole I find myself in, fits me rather neatly, doesn’t it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!’ This is such a powerful idea that as the sun rises in the sky and the air heats up and as, gradually, the puddle gets smaller and smaller, it’s still frantically hanging on to the notion that everything’s going to be alright, because this world was meant to have him in it, was built to have him in it; so the moment he disappears catches him rather by surprise. I think this may be something we need to be on the watch out for.

* Speech at Digital Biota 2, Cambridge, UK, 1998

Source: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Douglas_Adams

 


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#clmooc #light Like Dandelions

Kim Douillard’s Sunshine on a Stem

Yes, I love these words, so powerful in their simplicity and wish. Interestingly, Kim doubted her metaphor, and shared it out to us for comment. When I read her post, I smiled, knowing that on my wall in my classroom is a tall poster that reads: Dandelions are my favorite flower because they refuse to stop growing. It’s there every year, for almost thirty years. So Kim, we educators love that metaphor!

This is Write with Light  [Storytelling with Light] Week 5 of #clmooc. And the first story I thought of was this metaphor, so I neoned it the best I could:

dandelion_kim1

But it just didn’t seem quite the light it needed. I live in a rural area, and there’s not much in supplies for glowing things, but I do have Keynote on my Mac.  And I know I can make words and images sparkle and shimmer with light with that app. So I created the video above [first in Keynote, then in iMovie, and on to YouTube. It's not perfect, but it fits with light, sparkling dandelion constellations, and growing writers and tinkerers and explorers. Because I did those things to make it.

But the best Make on Like Dandelions is from Anna Smith with her Zeega.

Like Dandelions

► Play Zeega ►

by anna

 

Thanks #clmooc team this week [ the Maker Jawn Initiative from the Free Library of Philadelphia ], Kim Douillard, and Kevin Hodgson for inspiring this Write with Light.

How are you writing with light this week?

 

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#clmooc #constellation Three Brown Dots

constellationThreeBrownDots

 

Three Brown Dots

of the Southern Sky

 To say the name is to say the story.

Three Brown Dots

Long ago when we people struggled for survival, we found a friend in the wolf. Yes, often he tagged along as we hunted, waiting for what we left, but soon we discovered that in the morning the fearsome creature left tracks to the new trails of the herd we followed. And soon our relationship grew, each helping the other feed our families.

Around the fire at night, we would see their eyes out in the tall grass or peeking by the pine.

The children would throw scraps to them, and soon they moved in closer, but not too close.

One day, our small one slept under the stars, and when she opened her eyes in the morning, there, a few feet from her, lay a small pup, his head facing her, nose pointing to her as its head rested between its front paws. Brown eyes blinked.

“Three brown dots,” she called out.

The pup’s tail curled up, but all else did not move.

“Three brown dots,” she called again, and tossed a scrap of dried venison to the pup.

And so it was, “Three Brown Dots” and the child became friends, keeping their distance, but knowing each other.

Many moons later as the child became a woman, her friend did not return one morning, and so after days, our people mourned the loss of our “Three Brown Dots.” As we told the story, the young woman looked into the sky and saw there in the southern sky, three twinkling brown stars. And soon she saw her friend, walking in the sky, looking down at her, tail curled.

And today you see Three Brown Dots walking.

See, just there.

And if you say the name, say the story.


In Memory of Our Three Brown Dots

three_brown_dots


Have you created your constellation? Or your story? Please join the 2014 Constellation Collaboration by

Kevin Hodson’s CLMOOC’s Constellation Collaboration

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#CCSSBlog Think Integrative Think Interactive

Common Core: What Works?

Common Core Cognitive Verbs

On a field trip with my sixth grade students, we stopped at a park across the street from an ice cream parlor. As I walked back from the store to the park with the last group of kids, one of them looked down at the crosswalk markings and asked, “What are those white lines for anyway?

Crosswalk. That’s a pretty important word for city kids for safety. It’s doubly important for a rural kid visiting the big city. But until we were there, walking in the crosswalk, the whole implication for its meaning was just a blur, a word we said without real understanding.

Vocabulary. The Common Core State Standards has plenty. Robert Marzano pulled from the CCSS a list of the common core cognitive verbs representing the thinking strategies students must do when accomplishing the standards. His ASCD article explains six steps to teach these cognitive verbs.

However, like the word crosswalk, like any word or concept, we must “Experience first; live in the world that the language is about,” says James Paul Gee in this Vialogue on Learning and Literacy  He adds, “If you have lived in the world the language is about, if you have an image and actions and practices with other people to associate the words, then it’s easy.”

As language arts teachers, we understand this. Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey remind us that:

 ”In particular, students need to use target vocabulary in their spoken language before they can be  expected to use it in more formal written language. As Bromley (2007) reminds us, Language proficiency grows from oral  competence to written competence. All  students benefit from purposeful use of new vocabulary within the context of meaningful and engaging activities. This is even more  critical for adolescent English language  learners who are simultaneously learning English while learning in English (Fisher,  Frey, & Rothenberg, 2008). “p. 4 [emphasis added]

Therefore, we and the students need to be doing these thinking activities and using the language, talking about them before we expect students to understand them and apply them in their reflections on “I can….”

With so many words and concepts to learn, and so many standards, how do we accomplish this?

Think Integrative. Think Interactive.

literacy2bssre

Integrate the standards into projects that promote interactive teamwork and discussion to create a product. During the discussions and conferences, use, define, and act on the concepts, strategies, and vocabulary relevant to that integrated goal. Live the experience of the goal.

For example, last February as Digital Literacy Day approached, many of our language arts students wondered these questions:

How do we share our information in a more interesting way, like a website does?

How can images add to and make more clear [complement] information?

On our topic, what information should be backed with media and how will we choose?

So we adapted an activity suggested by Digital Literacy Day at: Paper Cut Outs to live those ideas and decisions. See the activity in the embedded document at the end of this post (or here), which includes the integrated standards and the interactive team components [ “Team Discussions”].

At each step, students are collaborating to analyze the information and media in their research and their own decisions for media that matches their topic for their blogs.  As facilitator to the groups, I pop into their discussions to guide them in vocabulary, collaboration, strategies, concepts, decision-making, etc. This is where students “live in the world that the language is about.” This is the “context of meaningful and engaging activities.

As Fisher and Frey explain:

“Effective vocabulary instruction requires that words are taught within context, that definitional and contrastive meanings are provided, and that students have multiple, authentic experiences with using words in their spoken and written language (Beck, McKeown, &Kucan, 2002; Blachowicz & Fisher, 2000;   Graves, 2006.)” p. 9 [emphasis added]

With each team, questions are asked that include content, vocabulary, and processes; students discuss using the vocabulary:

How did you gather relevant information?

How did you analyze the information from the text to determine the central idea?

What in the text helped you see how this idea developed?

How did you paraphrase the conclusion?

How did you compose an objective summary?

How did you create visual displays that demonstrated the salient points?

How do you explain how the ideas and visual displays clarify your topic?

How did you build on each others’ ideas?

How did you cite your sources?

 It is during these intentional conversations that the concepts of content, vocabulary, and process come alive for the student, a crosswalk, a safe and guided path to understanding. We want to them to engage in a crosswalk, not just tell them or provide one model.

So, in teams and with frequent feedback and discussion with each team, the students who chose this goal completed their integrated project. The model and prompt provided guidance for students to plan, design, and publish their information in Kidblog. Other students chose other integrated goals.

Fisher and Frey explain an effective vocabulary program is one that:

 ”offers carefully selected words that are presented in context and modeled by the teacher; associative experiences that emphasize both the definitional and contrastive meanings of words, accompanied by student interaction with words and one another; and generative experiences that allow students to make it their vocabulary. p. 9” [emphasis added]

But consider this part of the larger picture of the Common Core State Standards. If we want students to dig deeper and think critically, then they need to live this in authentic interactions and experiences, to verbalize with each other the concepts and processes to make them theirs.

Let them live in the language to understand it, whether it is a process, a strategy, a concept, a behavior, or vocabulary. Give them a crosswalk to understanding.

Common Core: What works?

Think integrative. Think interactive. Think living in the language.

Literacy_James_Paul_Gee

 


Fisher, Douglas, and Nancy Frey. “The value of intentional vocabulary instruction in the middle grades.“ Professional Development Series 16 (2010): p.4, 9.

“Vialogues : James Paul Gee and Embedded/embodied Literacy.” Vialogues. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 July 2014 (about 06:20-30).


Digital Literacy Day Project

 

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#clmooc #k6diglit Invitation to Stay Connected

sundaydiglit

Margaret Simon asks a question: Tapping Student Connections

How do we tap into student interests and create online learning environments for them to connect to and learn from? 

That is the question for DigLit Sunday bloggers from Margaret Simon.  And I’ve written an invitation to stay connected as Middle School educators here. This post continues that invitation.

What about a hub — a blog of prompts for students?

One way I thought of is to form a group of Middle Level Educators who collaborate on a blog of prompts from which students respond, connect to other students, and perhaps plan collaboration on the prompts. The blog would be the hub of student choice, or teacher guidance, a Make Bank of our own. I created such a blog for us to develop to get us started and, for #clmooc-ers, to stay connected:

cropped-connect2learn-1pc4deg

Connect 2 Learn

If you’re already interested, here’s the spot to join by sending me an email: Contact Connect2Learn and choose “Facilitator Request” so I can add you to the blog as facilitator.

A bit more on Connect 2 Learn:

When we write, we often write first for ourselves to gather ideas [inside/personal], and then share and discuss with others [responsive/connective]. Next we may share out to inform [purposeful/informative/narrative], and we may also share out to  help others or make the world better [social action/argumentative/persuasive].

I thought perhaps these purposes would be good ways to organize the blog:

Do I want to be reflective / personal and perhaps share that with others [responsive]?

Do I want to take what I know, add it to others idea’s? [responsive]

Do I want to share information or a story? [purposeful]

Do I want to make the world better? [social action]

Of course, these are recursive — each of us moves through these frames of writing, these frames of thinking about writing — as we develop our projects.  These frames are not my ideas, but rather are the work of Liz Stephens and Kerry Ballast (Liz Stephens and Kerry Ballast (2011). Using Technology to Improve Adolescent Writing: Digital Make-Overs for Writing Lessons) who present this new paradigm for writing lessons that includes the four frames, four lenses to view process writing and assignments. I thought they made a great way to organize our collaborative prompts.  [I've written about this here and here [scroll down].

But: it would be our blog. Join, and help build it: Contact Connect2Learn and choose “Facilitator Request” so I can add you to the blog as facilitator.

But how do we discuss and plan our projects?

Many people have commented on how difficult it is to follow  threads of conversations — and find them again on Google Plus. So I researched and discovered another platform — MightyBell that serves as a focal point for general members, allows for smaller communities within the larger one [think planning projects with a team of educators], and even smaller circles of projects. That sounded like a possibility for better conversation and collaboration. Of course we would always stay connected throughout the year with #clmooc.

So I created Connect in the Middle community at Mightybell with a circle for planning the collaborative blog called Connect 2 Learn, same name as the blog.

An invitation

Please consider joining with myself and others — for planning and collaboration, join these two communities:

Connect in the Middle community

Connect 2 Learn Circle

and the collaborative blog hub:

Connect 2 Learn  Contact Connect2Learn

Hopefully, these will help us stay connected as Middle School educators, planning projects with and for our students, to identify the entry points for play and learning, and  to lead them towards a connected learning path.

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#clmooc Writing Hacking Defining Week 4 Reflection #k6diglit

Writing Hacking Defining

14192_voice_elliot_friToday, I celebrate conversation, and the continuing celebrations each day at #clmooc. In the Hangouts and chats, in our posts, we continue the conversation about writing and making and hacking.

I keep thinking about the conversations about defining ‘hack.”

I think about what I do at home when I need a hack to fix something. It fixes something. It’s a positive. Maybe that’s not a hack. It’s fixes something, making it better.

So what do I do? I have read the excellent history of hacking from  Terry Elliot’s post on hacking, and it is the celebration of what is true in life: there’s good and bad.

Even so, I’m not convinced what I do in writing is destructive, nor does it need to be in order to be a hack, because there are two sides.

And I need to think of my presentation to middle school students; what do I want them to understand and consider?

So, I’m hacking a definition for hack. Well, I’m sharing how the word has evolved with my voice, and how my students will find their voice through their hacks.

 

Here’s my thoughts, with thanks to Deanna Mascle, Kevin Hodgson, and Terry Elliot:

I saw throughout the week this reshaping,

re-imaging of ideas–

IDENTITY Re-imagining

My favorite Hack is from Larry Hewett, an About Me project to begin the year. I’ve done something similar, but I love this. Here’s what he did, hacked slightly by me:
1. Choose three words that describe yourself.
2. Pick one song for each of your three words that represents that word.
3. Find the lyrics of the songs.
4. Lift words, phrases and entire lines from the three lyrics in order to create an original song about yourself.
5. Find an image to represent both the word and the lyrics you choose.
6. Decide how you will present “Your Song” (lyrics / images / words).

Connecting, Modifying,  and Re-imagining Meaning

Love what Amy Cody Clancy did with HyperText and more. Check out all her posts and blog.

Students connect in their writing in Google Docs through hyperlinks that link to content that explains their meaning.

Or students highlight only the key words for a poem or insights into their topic, adding hyperlinks to more information or images.

Not only could you create a “choose your own adventure”, but I think this is a great way to start or end a collaborative research project. Students find links / resources to add to the document. Then students take their focus of their first search to create what +Charlene Doland mentioned — their part of the conversation. They could create something that explains the research but adding their insights. Below the initial text then could be placed a thinglink or list of the collaborative research — with a final collaborative paragraph as a hypertext team syntheses as a summary.

Devising New Meaning

Next, Kathleen Galarza gave a great idea which I thought could inspire kids to write in their homework journals.  While listening to one of her favorite TV shows, she jotted down lines she linked. She used those to write a “one-sided phone conversation” which looks like a poem, and we infer the message from those lines.
Kids could do the same — maybe at school, they could make a poem for two voices by combining with a friend.  Could prove interesting. They will have devised new meaning from the same words. Responding to the conversation concept, Mary Morgan Ryan did continue the conversation from the same TV serious but different show to counter Kathleen’s conversation. You can see the fun, and the discussions about writing that could begin.

Devising New Meaning for New Audiences

Mary Morgan Ryan hacked her school annual report to be a poster for students in her library. Same words reapplied for different purpose and audience.

Audience and Purpose

So, in very positive ways, writing was hacked to modify or devise writing through insightful choosing of words — cutting the clutter, rearranging, or linking to make meaning more clear for different audiences and purposes.

As #clmooc organizers reflected this week:

The highly participatory nature of the cultural moment we live in demands a new kind of critical literacy. As educators we want to empower our students to become engaged complex thinkers. Meenoo Rami stated “I want my students to code, decode, make, break things. I want them to shape an argument, to engage civically, to be critical thinkers.” Perhaps hacking (as a methodology applied to writing) might help us get there.

Another excellent reflection on this comes from Kevin Hodgson [who introduces us to the Hack for Change movement] and also asks, what ran through my mind:

What concepts bubble up when you “hack writing”?

  • Agency of the writer/composer

  • Lens of the reader

  • Word choice/Image choice/Video choice

  • Ownership of content

This is what I think of while teaching and learning with my middle school students. So, again, celebrate our conversation — and choose your path.


 Connected Learning / DigLit Sunday

How was all this hacking accomplished?  Many ways– and we should celebrate what we’ve done and what we’ve learned:

First, the folks at Connected Learning Alliance created a Connected Learning Massive Open Online Collaboration through a Google Plus Community whereby participants could network, connect on topics of interest, and openly share their creations and hacks. Participants’ interests determined collaborative projects and conversation [see above], and when issues arose, questions were asked, and peers supported each other with tips, solutions, and further collaboration. Throughout the production-oriented “hacking” week, posts included possible applications to the classroom [ academically oriented]. We were connected learners.

Besides the CLMOOC blog, Make Bank,Google Hangout, and Google Plus Community, Kim Douillard started a CLMOOC Flickr group for participants to openly share their work. Hopefully, people there will license their work as Creative Commons so others may reuse, remix, and hack their originals for further sharing and hacking. And of course, Twitter sharing and conversation [clmooc chat].

Other Tech Tools that provided opportunities to collaborate, share, present, and remix are:

Blogs [see Blog Hub ]

Visual Poetry

Google Docs

Google Forms to submit Kevin Hodson Comics and join Voxer Chat

Voxer

Vocaroo

Prezi [ above]

Animoto

YouTube

Vialogues

Zeega

Wordle

Various Photo Apps depending on devices, for the various Kim Douillard Photo Challenges

Tackk.com

 

Technology is a tool that allows literate learners to connect and collaborate. Let’s celebrate our conversation and collaboration. If you are new, choose a tool, and join #clmooc today — just to lurk around and learn one thing new! Then celebrate one thing you learned today!  Let us know!


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#clmooc Invitation Middle School Educators

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An Invitation to Connect Middle School Educators
Teachers, Principals, Librarians, etc.

As a member of #clmooc, I created two collaborative spaces: Connect in the Middle and Connect 2 Learn to provide a space for middle school educators to connect and plan for their own and their students’ collaborative efforts. This platform is free up to 100 members, so it can help us stay connected as a a group.

I teach language arts to grades 6, 7, 8 in a very rural area of Wa State. 

Join me in Connect in the Middle https://mightybell.com/communities/connect-in-the-middle
Connect in the Middle provides a space for middle school educators to connect and plan for their own and their students collaborative efforts

Our goal is to establish a community where members can connect to share ideas, or form a circle within the community to plan collaborative projects or other needed discussions (CCSS, for example.).

A circle within the Connect in the Middle MightyBell Community is Connect 2 Learn on Mightybell https://mightybell.com/spaces/85832 

Middle School Educators who would like to connect classrooms through prompts on a collaborative blog can discuss that idea here
I teach language arts to grades 6 7 8 in a rural are of Wa State. I would like my students to collaborate or connect with other students in authentic writing to guide them in online citizenship and in their own passions through their own writing and making.

I blog here whatelse.edublogs.org/
And created this blog
connect2learn.edublogs.org as the connective blog for students to find tasks of interest to them to connect, perhaps collaborate, with other students.

This space provides a place to discuss how to develop these connections and prompts.

I hope you join.

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#clmooc teach writers

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Please read this important post by Kim Douillard:

https://thinkingthroughmylens.wordpress.com/2014/07/08/a-burr-in-your-sock/

I’m thinking about these powerful words Kim wrote

“I worry about who in our schools gets the most formulaic writing. Why are our English learners, our students of color, our students who live below the poverty line most likely to get writing instruction that is pre-chewed, scaffolded to the point that no thinking is required? In the name of being helpful, we are robbing students of the opportunity to make sense of their thinking through writing.

And yet, letting go of the formulaic means inviting messiness, losing control, welcoming confusion in order to find clarity and coherence. What replaces the formula? That is a question that I am asked over and over again. The answers aren’t easy, they aren’t neat, and they mean teaching writers rather than writing.”

The answer is there:
“teaching writers rather than writing” so that they can “make sense of their thinking through writing.”

We offer many choices for authentic writing and teach the writer– the wordsmith.

We can accomplish this through student planned frames rather than formulas. I’ve written about it here:

http://whatelse.edublogs.org/2014/07/06/clmooc-play-is-the-game/

I’m also remembering the work of James Moffett: Active Voices- Writing across the Curriculum and others books. http://www.amazon.com/Active-Voice-Writing-Program-Curriculum/dp/0867092890#

His work reflects much of the Connected Learning Principles as students write in genres they choose for their audience and purpose. Important is oral language, peer feedback, and and choice in a workshop approach to teach each writer.

Isn’t that what we’ve learned from technology as well? We teach writers what they need ‘just in time’ for their needs and purposes.

What do you think?

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#clmooc Adjacent Possible and Embodied Learning

Adjacent Possible, Embodied Learning,  and Verbal Learning:

yoda_passion

Connected Learning Principles and Values 

Reflection inspired by Terry Elliott

Note: Connected Learning Principles

ConnectedLearning_report.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved July 7, 2014, from http://dmlhub.net/sites/default/files/ConnectedLearning_report.pdf

Interest Powered

“When a subject is personally interesting and relevant, learners achieve much higher-order learning outcomes.

Interest: I wanted something I could use with my class, so I invented the Poetry Tag activity. Others seemed interested in this as well and joined in. From that we learned new apps and connected. We found play in the remix. At the same time, Kim added several poetry/photo games, which added to our growing venue of poetry games to hack for our classrooms. From these we learned about tools to enhance the learning: Notegraphy, Painteresque, Google Storybuilder.  https://storify.com/grammasheri/poetry-tag

Peer Supported

In their everyday exchanges with peers and friends, young people are contributing, sharing and giving feedback in inclusive social experiences that are fluid and highly engaging.

Poetry Tag and Photo/Poetry contests: Lots of contributing and sharing in many ways, with choice being for the creator [ Google Plus, Blogs, Twitter, Notegraphy ] I think feedback came in the Google Storybuilder hacks of the poetry — the message from the poetry game was a shift in paradigms, emphasized by both Storybuilders.

Kevin
Sheri

Academically Oriented

Learners flourish and realize their potential when they can connect their interests and social engagement to academic studies, civic engagement, and career opportunity

Kim’s blog shows a blend of personal and career activities related to her passions: photography and poetry.
Janis Selby Jones added civic engagement to our Game Week with Litterati

Some of Kim’s #wabisabi combined the out place with nature, which could be related to Litterati.

The poetry, photography, interests, games, and posts/tweets demonstrated digital literacies: drafts, presentation, media, design, reflection, social action. That’s a lot of academics, and we didn’t post any objectives on the “directions.” We simply suggested; participants acted; we all learned. [adjacent possible]

Production Centered

Digital tools provide opportunities for producing and creating a wide variety of media, knowledge, and cultural content in experimental and active ways

Maha and Shyam reminded us of cultural differences.
Maha Bali 
Shyam Sharma

We produced to share: blogs, twitter, notegraphy, GPlus, tackk.com, hackpad, Storybuilder, Fold a Story

Openly Networked

Online platforms and digital tools can make learning resources abundant, accessible, and visible across all learner settings.

See production-centered

If we shared, we were networked.
Some were hackable; some like Poetry Tag, we hacked lines and carried them into the next iteration.

We gathered as in Storify.
We can use hashtags #clpoettag #clmooc #middleschool #25wordstory to gather our openly networked productions.

Shared Purpose

Experiences invite participation and provide many different ways for individuals and groups to contribute. when educational opportunity is available and accessible to all young people, it elevates the world we all live in.

I think  that Joe Dillon’s tweet presents our shared purpose: “identify entry points for play and learning for all. ‘’ We are reaching back for that joy of learning in play and purpose. Each activity blends academics and play; we explore language through our creations; we share language through our reflections and conversations. We are connected learning – embodied.

Equity

Experiences invite participation and provide many different ways for individuals and groups to contribute. when educational opportunity is available and accessible to all young people, it elevates the world we all live in.

Equity in Opportunity. With such a plethora of choices, those who lurked, observed and did with that on their own; those who were interested, chose and shared. We don’t really know the effect, but we do know in the sharing, that interest creates action; action inspires sharing; sharing builds connections and iterations; connections spawn conversations, reflections, and revisions. The equity is in the opportunity to participate; it is up to participants and those who know who the lurkers are to encourage participation through invitation and relationship.

In the Poetry Tag, people chose GPlus, Twitter, Notegraphy, Visual Poetry to share — choice.

Social Connection

Young people are provided with multiple learning contexts for engaging in connected learning—contexts in which they receive immediate feedback on progress, have access to tools for planning and reflection, and are given opportunities for mastery of specialist language and practices.

Perhaps so far we haven’t conveyed feedback, except in the participation of the activities and in #f5f and reflections. As teachers, we need to be cognizant of this and plan for it. But, once again, students need to explore through observation of those ready to reflect and critique before they participate in it themselves. Our feedback is in the positive: emphasizing what worked for each of us so that others may try. It builds relationships and possible ideas for our next attempts. Positivism gives us strength and courage to continue. As we build our strengths, we prune our weaknesses. We are evergreen and growing.

Full Participation

learning environments, communities, and civic life thrive when all members actively engage and contribute.

Here we see flux, according to our needs and time. I think the keys are caring, relationships, choice, autonomy. People need to know they are cared for and about, they need to relate to [interest] the situation, they need choice in actions, and they need the autonomy to do it in their way as their contribution to the larger picture.

Learning participation is a continuum of actions, skills, and progress.

Theses? Antitheses? Syntheses? *
A place for string to small to save or ideas out of network, perhaps an unknown unknown that has come to light. 

Perhaps:
“THE RICH COMPLEXITIES OF EVERYDAY LIFE” SAYS IT ALL: WE ARE COMPLEX BEINGS; OUR LEARNING IS JUST AS COMPLEX, AND “INSTRUCTION” ENCOMPASSES A LEARNER-CENTER, WITH LEARNER BEING TEACHER AND STUDENT. ~INSPIRED BY KIM DOUILLARD  [ Post ]

Tellio from Vialogues: “You must live in the world the language is about for the language to make sense.”

Yoda: The key, passion is.  Yeesssssss.

Our current education system was designed for a factory of skilled, repetitive workers. Today’s world needs the passion of multi-talents to solve our world issues. Students learn through their passions. Isn’t that why “interest-powered” is first?

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