#Digilit Sunday Google Apps and iPads

 

 sundaydiglit

DigiLit Sunday is a Sunday post on literacy, an invitation by Margaret Simon, to share literacy strategies and tools for the classroom. This week’s list of bloggers: Sunday, September 21, 2014.

 

 What I learned on Twitter on Sunday….

Tips for Using Google Apps on the iPad

Note: the most common tip from the experts:  Use Google Chrome app.

To keep up with all news Google Drive, follow their blog: Google Drive

or the official Google Blog

 

1. Five Tips for Google + iPad: Click here to go to article: Tips


Summary:

1. Download Google Apps: Install all of the featured apps on this page: Google Apps for iOS. All of Google’s mobile apps work as a team. Links will open in Chrome instead of Safari.

2. Google Search App: Enable hands-free, voice search trigger for the Google Search app.
Now simply say, “Okay, Google,” your device will beep, and start “listening” for your search query. If you ask a question, Google will read the answer back to you! Think of how much this can help students.  “Okay, Google,” can be enabled in Google Chrome on the desktop. Chrome on the iPad can also do voice search, but not “Okay, Google.”

3. gMail App: Use the gMail app, not the native iOS Mail app, which sucks up your storage space. The Gmail app is better, faster, and is cloud-based. The Gmail app will also let you connect multiple gmail accounts. If you don’t have a personal gMail account, consider getting one for all the benefits of the spam filters, speed, and the other apps associated with it.

4. Use a Google Calendar App: Google Desktop Calendar plays nicely with most other calendar applications out there, but to get the gcal functionality you have on the desktop, use a Google Calendar app.  Although Google does not offer an official Google Calendar app for the iPad, choose one with gcal functionality. Kasey recommends Sunrise (free) or Calendars 5 by Readdle ($6.99).

5. Google+ Google Plus is currently the fastest growing social network. With Google+ app on your iOS device you can auto-backup your photos and videos to Google! What is the number one storage hog on iPads?  photos and videos. Let Google+ back up to your Google+ account.

Also, Google+ is builds your personal learning network and your collaboration with like-minded educators. Kasey’s 5 Reasons Educators Should Use Google Plus.

2. Add images to Google Docs on the iPad

 

Watch the video in the link; read the directions.

Summary:

1. Chrome app works best.

2. In Chrome choose “mobile site” and go to drive.google.com to log in.

3. Create a new document– stay in Chrome; don’t go to the Drive app.

4. Choose Document and add a title, click create.

5. This is the important part: When the page loads with your new document, click on ‘Desktop’ for the page mode type at the bottom of the page. See bottom of above image.

6. Now you can click “insert —> image” from the menu. [screenshot]

7. Click the blue Add Image button in the middle of the pop-up that appears. Choose Camera Roll.  [screenshot]

8 Choose your picture.

 

3. Google Drive’s Magic ‘i’ — the iPad and Google  = Collaboration

On the desktop, when you click a document [pdf, slides, document, spreadsheets] in  the list on your Drive, the new Drive asks “Open-in” from which you can open virtually any document.

How do you get to the “open-in” on your iPad?

When you click the “i” button in an iPad app, you discover the choice to “Open in.”  Almost any product you make on the iPad can be uploaded to Google Drive and housed in the cloud.

Example: Students [or teachers] create an iMovie. They go to Google Drive, choose the upload button and then upload that iMovie from the camera roll into their Drive accounts using the “Open in” choice. They can share that file and/or movie/photo with their peer from Google Drive, and now the students can collaborate in iMovie — or what ever app file you’re working with.

As you can see, I’ve added to my knowledge from the experts on Twitter, where anyone is an expert if you know an answer to the questions asked. It’s an open forum that levels the field: experts and novices become collaborators with their own expertise.

Sunday, I focused on learning about Google Apps with the iPad since our teachers use their iPads with our Google Apps for Education.

How do you start Twitter? Start with a personal account. Here are several resources:

Twitter 101 

Twitter Prezi 

Twitter Handout

Twitter Post

As Steve Jobs said, “Just ask.” What are your questions?


Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.

#DigiLit Organize Twitter PLN Lists

sundaydiglit

 

 

DigiLit Sunday

It’s Sunday!  DigiLit Sunday is a Sunday post on literacy, an invitation by Margaret Simon, to share literacy strategies and tools for the classroom. This week’s list of bloggers: Sunday, Aug 24, 2014

Question: My Twitter is overflowing – How do I manage it?

Where did my PLN go? Twitter is my go to place for resources and connections. As you gain followers and follow others, you Twitter feed will grow with wonders amazing: lessons, strategies, connections, questions, answers, resources, etc. And we want those literacy connections to be at the forefront…

Eventually, though, you’ll wonder where that original group of connections is in your Twitter stream. You’ll wonder where the key people’s tweets disappeared to. You’ll know you’re missing something on the topics of specific interest to you that those key people mostly tweet.

Yes, we’ve got #hashtags, but I there’s a conversation and stream of ideas from those connections that are near and dear to your heart– those whose ripples of information and conversation connect mostly with your [and their] situation?

How do you keep connected with those in addition to you regular stream?

Lists.

First of all, here are resources:

Here are the experts’ advice:

Twitter

Twitter Media

Mashable

Mashable: How To

Second, a quick over view:

Create a list

When logged in to Twitter, go to the gear icon and click Lists.

go to list

 

A list page will open, and you can create a list. Give it a name [can’t start with number].

create list button

create list

 

Note you can make it public or private as needed.

Now find people to add to your list. Search names or usernames.

find people

click gear to addClick the gear icon and choose add or remove from list.

find and add to list

When in your twitter stream, just click a name.

click name

Their profile will pop up — click the gear and add.

gear in profile

Of course, you can delete lists as well.

Just click the icon in your profile. Choose your list by clicking the title.

choose list

click delete

Click delete.

Third, find and subscribe to lists.

Now that you know how to create, add to, and delete a list — there’s a great option to get started with a pre-made list. For example, I wanted a list of Language Arts Teachers, and wouldn’t you know it, Judy Artz has a list. How do I know?

When at Judy’s profile, click more –> Lists.

judy profile

See all her lists, and click the name of the one of interest.

judy language arts list

click subscribeClick subscribe.

unsubscribeNotice that the button changes to “unsubscribe from list” in case you need to.

Notice that you can see all the members — with a gear icon by their name so you can add them to the list directly from her list.

see followers and add to list thereNotice it shows who you already follow.  And you can see the list of subscribers as well with the same information — add to list; see who you’re following.

subscribed to members of

Finally, use your lists.

Now that you’ve got the lists relevant to your PLN and your interests, just click the name of the list to see the tweets from those members. You don’t even need to follow a person to add them to the list, but usually you do.

Go forth and add a few manageable canals to your Twitter stream.

Back at your lists, you will find the lists to which you have subscribed, and the lists to which you have been added as a member!

twitter list stream

What Twitter organizing strategies do you use to keep focused on literacy strategies?

A Small Voice Gets An Answer

 

 

 

One Does What One Can

A Small Voice is Answered

IMG_6947Our dog loves this walk in the park below the transmission lines. She checks every message left by every other creature that walks here. And the scrubby elm trees provide the shade needed in our hot, semi-arid scrublands. The small watershed in this area provides home to all sorts of critters from red-winged blackbirds to killdeer to coyotes to, well, any creature needing a spot to rest or shelter from the heat or cold. And this is a place that many local residents [and their dog friends] visit regularly. We are fortune to have a place with trees, and we are thankful.

On June 18th, 2014, we took our old friend for her last walk here.

underthelinesthelasttime

She was so old, Scott had to pull her up and around so she could keep her balance. It was time. And on this day to reflect, we arrived to this:

IMG_7292

 

Crews cutting down our trees.

The area is managed by three entities: Bonneville Power Adminstration, United States Bureau of Recamation, and the local Coulee Area Park and Recreation District, who is supposed to be consulted about any changes or actions in the area.

Scott immediately called Bob Valen, the PARD Commissioner, while I took numerous pictures. I went home wondering what I could do. Helplessness is a terrible feeling. Meanwhile Bob Valen talked with the contracted crew at the park.

I had no idea who was cutting the trees down, but I organized my images into an animation video.  While creating it, I decided to tweet the issue, directly to USBR, who have been known to seemingly indiscriminately cut down trees on our walking paths. I also posted on Facebook, but that received a few local comments only.

 

 

 

— Sheri Edwards (@grammasheri) June 18, 2014

 

I even sent out a tweet on the benefits of trees — so many people have no clue how important they are to the environment and to the health of our communities. And for city crews, it’s just more work for them — so why bother?

 

By this time Scott had informed me that it wasn’t USBR, but was the Bonneville Power Administration [BPA]. And Bob Valen was trying to contact whoever was in charge at BPA.

 

 

An already stressful day with our dog was now doubly so with the possible loss of one of our area’s few treed areas for public play.

I returned to the park and took more devastating photos to add to the Animoto video.

trees gone

 

When I returned home, I found a message from Washington, DC Bureau of Reclamation who wanted to talk to me about my tweets!  I called the number, and the manager explained carefully that they had not been notified of  the clear-cutting, and that they were now in contact with BPA and PARD and were working on the issue. She was actually in town that day from DC and would check out the area herself. Wow!  The local USBR had also been contacted by DC wondering what was going on. I told her that those trees have been their for over thirty years, in a wetland area, and that local residents frequently access the area for walking. The local parks department has plans for the area, and the loss of trees would hurt wildlife and people’s use. I thanked her for taking the time to find out what the issue was for the community.

I persisted with Animoto videos to BPA since I hadn’t heard from them.

 

To be sure we were heard, I continued to try to reach BPA:

I never did hear from BPA myself.

But, a small voice received an answer from one of the powers-that-be. I tweeted a thank you.

 

And here’s what happened: the different entities worked together to find a solution, and only a few trees have been cut down since the initial invasion. If you look at the pictures, you can see that these are not your average neighborhood power poles — they are huge, and these thirty-year old trees will never get close to the wires.

14177_saved

This is the story of a small voice receiving an answer, and Twitter, a social media, got the attention needed to start the conversation.

Remember, “One does what one can.” We’ll miss our walks with Pooka, but we are glad for those people and furry friends that still have their shade.

legend sparrow.001

#edcampspokane Links

Thanks to #educampspokane organizers and sponsors and Mobius Science Center for a pre-event evening!
mobiusedcampspokane

Things to share:

Google Apps

Benefits of Google Apps

About Google Voice

Learn Google Apps  Lessons

Just Google It Presentation: Apps Based Classroom

Google Apps in the District: Our Websites and Collaboration – teacher  / student; process; example [ Cove Assignment student collaboration]

40 Ways to Start Using Google Apps in the Classroom by Becky Evans

Flubaroo Self-Grading

Google Docs BackChannel   Video 1

iTunes GAFE podcast

iTunes Video podcast

YouTube Training Videos

Google Apps Blog

Eric Curts work:  Google Plus for Schools  Apps User Group

Google Apps User Groups for NW USA

Google Hangouts on Air   Google Plus Hangout Community

Using Google Apps as a Free LMS (community)

Connected Classrooms, a Google Community

Learn Google Apps — for Students — Google Ninja

Google science fair – kids design science project, collect data, analyze, create website.

Google Keep — save, organize, notes

Google Apps Security

Google + email Trick  for other apps (Animoto, Voki, etc.)

Why Google (NSD)

Note: Many sites allow connection to Google for log in, such as Goorulearning:

gooulearning.org  Transform Learning. Inspire Students. Create and share collections of engaging web resources with your students. Browse courses in our K-12 Community Library to get started.

Tips from Google Apps Session with Tracy Sontrop, Session 3

Session 3 Notes

Lesson Plans for Google

Google Search Tips (Richard Byrne)

Better ReSearchers

Google Earth Walks

Google Earth Maps

Ask the Google Gooru

Google for Education

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PBL:  Project / Problem Based Learning

Kathy Schrock’s Authentic Learning Resources

Buck Institute for Education and PBLU (to reopen April 2014)

Projects, Problems, or just projects? by Jackie Gerstein

Genius Hour:  Wiki and Community  Twitter Chat: First Thursday 9 PM Eastern #geniushour

 Add Our Genius: site that includes specific scaffolding for students who need it

Joy Kirr: LiveBinder and Blog

Genius Hour ePub for our district

I Stand Eight: under construction PBL

All Dots Matter and Blog

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Build Your PLN

Edudemic’s Guide to Twitter

Edudemic / Shell Terrell Build Your PLN  Shell on Twitter

ASCD Will Richardson Build Your PLN

Edutopia’s Pinterest for PLN

Extend the Conversation and Blog (Two Friends — Denise Krebs ) and Site

A Twitter Idea #clmooc #etmooc #edquery #ce13

questionmarkblue This month, I’ve asked a few questions on Twitter — used hashtags and asked PLN. I really needed more than a few responses, and I know the Twitter PLN is an awesome place for answers. I’m wondering if we need an Education Query hashtag: #edquery

An #edquery hashtag would work like #comments4kids. Twitter users tune in to the #comments4kids hashtag to discover student blogs on which to comment to encourage the practice of positive social learning and sharing. I created a #comments4kids widget for our class blog so students could comment on those blogs.

With an #edquery hashtag, educators could tune in each day to respond to a question or two or retweet the ones they also are interested in. The conversations of responses could be a wealth of ideas all could learn and use. It could be the one place / tag on Twitter to discover answers to specific questions or to get referrals for apps or tools that would solve a problem. It could refer people to bloggers that provide insights to their particular situations. It’s widget would provide constant fuel for suggestions and blogging.

Here are just two of my recent questions:

A colleague is just getting text savvy, and has one iPad in his classroom he’d like to connect and display with onto his SmartBoard. Thankfully I was referred to Splashtop, but I know there are other ideas and apps out there because technology is a tool, and the tool we choose is the one that fits that moment and need. And twitter users share what they know and use so the query responses are very helpful.

Today I’m wondering about vocabulary: what tech tools and apps can enhance vocabulary acquisition? I know about Spelling and Vocabulary via Spelling City, Engrade FlashCards,  and Quizlet. Again though, I’m looking for choices, because blended learning offers the options for differentiation — and developing a repertoire of resources from those using the tools would greatly help this query.

So, what do you think? Would  #edquery be a good addition to our education hashtag helpers?

 

#nablopomo Writing Prompts for Educators #nablopomoed #clmooc

NaBloPoMo_November_blogroll_largeNeed a challenge for November?

BLOGGING (See next section for MICRO-BLOGGING)

I’m not sure if National Blog Post Month is official, but I signed up here. I’ve seen #nablowrimo and #nablopomo tags, so the challenge is on for me at #nablowrimo.  However, the prompts suggested for most bloggers are not ones that meet my focus.  So, if you are an educator who wants a challenge for November — not a word count, but a post count of “30 blog posts and 15 comments,” here are some possible prompts for the month of November.

Their purpose is to engage the total educator, not just the classroom person, but the day-to-day thoughts and actions of who we are. They are often general to allow for your interpretation. So perhaps a new tag is in order: National Blog Post Month Educator #nablopomoed

Here are suggested prompts — just post 3o times/ comment 15 times:

1: Why I accepted the challenge

2: Write a response to a blog you read today

3: Write a few suggestions for prompts for educators (link to your post as a comment below for others)

4: I look forward to Monday because…

5: Election Day reflection or If Tuesdays were sweet, they’d be…

6: On the way to school today I noticed…

7: It’s the end of the quarter. Consider grading practices…

8: Fridays always…

9: On Saturdays…

10: Over the past week I considered…

11: Veterans Day reflection (Note: Remembrance Day in Canada; Armistice Day)

12: On “off” days, I usually…

13: Weather description, a sample of setting…

14: The best think about my PLN is …

15: I’d like to thank…

16: Chores and other matters

17: Sunday morning,

18: The best part of teaching is…

19: My family knows that…

20: What I like to learn about…

21: A great strategy to encourage learning is…

22: A celebration for today…

23: Time for…

24: If only…

25: Connections

26: Creating

27: Singing

28: Thankfulness

29: Favorite recipe (of food or learning …)

30: Reflection Theme: What six words describe your November?

 

Thanks for joining with me for A Post A Day, short and sweet for #nablopomo and #nablopomoed

nablopomoed

 

nablopomoed_prompts.003

 

 


MICRO-BLOGGING UPDATE

My PLN friend @tracywatanabee asks:

“Any ideas of how to modify for me? I can’t do a post a day.”

Two suggestions:

1: “Modify: Count the posts you write! You don’t have to do the prompts 🙂 Do you post something each day? Use that!”

2: Be a micro-blogger on Twitter .  Just write 30 original tweets (use the prompts or your own ideas) and reply in a conversation 15 times.  30 + 15 = 45

 Here’s the badge:

 

 

nablopomoed.micro Join the November Blogging team — try one or both: Blog / Comment or Tweet / Reply

 

 


 

 

Calendars

US Apples4Teacher Calendar

Holidays Around the World

Connect in the Middle: Tweet #midlevt One idea

 

The Commons: No copyright

 

Let’s brighten up our connections:

Here’s an idea, this first project from 2//11/13 to 2/17/13:

Please tweet with #midlevt an idea you are using in your classroom (lesson, tool, strategy). It could be an easy tweet, or link to a post — old or new!

Do you think you can?

Just ONE tweet during that time. 🙂

 

Thanks, Sheri

What do you think?

 

 

 

 

+++++++++

I have decided to play with this Projects thing. Have any of you used this aspect of wikispaces?

Well, it seems that since we are all organizers, we can’t be in teams, because as organizers we see all teams and projects. Interesting…

Let’s see what happens to the Project Page.

Look forward to your sharing… Thanks, Sheri