DigiLit Sunday #clmooc Writing

sundaydiglit

 

DigiLit Sunday

DigiLit Sunday is a Sunday post on literacy, an invitation by Margaret Simon, to share literacy strategies and tools for the classroom.

This week I’m rethinking the writing process and tools.

Prior to digital tools, students would prewrite, draft, revise, review, revise, find feedback, and publish on paper. I’m not sure how many writers actually write this way. I know for fiction, I just start writing in Google Docs and let my characters start their journey. How would I help students experience this? How would it help develop word choice and plot?

Digital Tool

I’ve discovered a new tool I love, tackk.com . Be sure to sign up at the Education version if you chose to use this. It shares to Edmodo, and can be assigned through Edmodo so students can login with their Edmodo credentials. The Global Read Aloud is even using Tackk this year.  Public, or private, designing with Tackk is super easy. I like to know these things up front before I get excited about a new tool.

How can I help students experience the on-demand and online strategies of writing and revising?

Digital Prompt and Model

I designed a Tackk: FindWay as a story prompt and model to share with students. The prompt starts with the story and ends with directions and revision questions for peer collaboration.

Prompt and Model: Finding My Way

I created this story online, starting with a quest to find relief from the heat in a favorite swimming spot with friends. Tackk allows you to find glyphs, images, and videos to augment your own text using their built-in search for each. In addition, you can upload your own images and video.  It’s easy to move sections up and down and revise as needed.

During the story writing, I composed as a I wrote [see Directions at end], to fit the images that I could find. I prefer stills; I like the that I put myself into the image, instead of having action of a video clip take over my and my readers’ imaginations. It’s my choice; each writer must choose their own. I noticed many animations in the ‘gliphy’ search, which could work well for student stories.

During the story writing, I edited/revised as I wrote — descriptions, dialogue, imagery, action, etc.

During the story writing, I found the repetitive phrase to bring the good luck/bad luck of the story together: I sighed; I smiled.

When I present this, these are discussions for our class, including asking students for feedback on my work, which I ask them to do as they finish their stories. Of course, they could opt to create a story, revising together as I did.

Tackk, as you see, illustrates beautifully, including sound. The right sidebar offers choice in design, easy to discover, and a custom URL can be created.

Finally, Tackk lets others collaborate or comment. It can be shared with many sites, like Tumblr, Instagram, Pinterest, and more. And it can be embedded in a webpage or blog [see below].

Digital Writing

What do you think?

I can see this for sharing nonfiction ideas as well as fiction. I found it very easy to revise as I designed and composed with many options inserting media.  Students would be able to follow a creative process and share their efforts. This is a powerful tool for composing: thinking and revising with text, images, and video alone or in collaboration.

How could you use Tackk in your classroom?


 

Digital Adventure Story-5 Slides-5 Artists-2 Stories #etmooc

We’re on our way to 5 adventure stories.

Enjoy our presentation (here’s how we started- Adventure Collaboration ).

Who are we? @gallit_z   @MsLHall   @lindapemik   @mrsdkrebs  @grammasheri

Imagine your own story as you flip through the slides 1-6. On slide seven (7), click one of the links to hear a story from these same slides, but rearranged for each author. More coming soon.

Adapted from #etmooc
7: Plan a “Choose Your Own Adventure Story” (Collaborate) Adaptation:
Draw an object Then ask a peer to draw a related object. Pass your peer’s drawing on to another peer and have them draw a related object. Keep doing this until you have 5 drawings (including your original object).
Create a story that links the original object with the last object drawn. What is the connection between the first object and the last object?
Write a brief story, then try to create multiple pathways that a user could go through the story. Use a mind-mapping tool

http://etmooc.org/

What story do hear? Want to create your own? Make a copy of the slideshow and rearrange the middle three slides of the story (slides 2-5) to create your own. Let us know the link to your adventure in the comments below…

Remix: Beauty of Connected Stories #etmooc

Stories: crystals of life held for time…

A remix…

 

Watch Darren Kuropatwa‘s archived session here, learn from Darren’s Slides and find more resources here.

During the session Darren asked participants to record and share 5 seconds of video with him via DropitTOme and then compiled them into this “Beauty” short video. He invited others to Popcorn it !  Above is mine after an inspirational video remix by Rhonda Jessen.

Won’t you remix this “Beauty” short video too?

A Digital PLN Story #etmooc

Hang Out

How do you build a PLN? Take a risk. Be JoLLE: Join, Lurk, Learn, Extend.

In 2011 Denise Krebs and I began an adventure, and I am forever grateful for the friends and support that have been shared back and forth since then, and continues even now.

Here’s our story, approved by Denise, my friend, because @cogdog asked for stories of positive connections:

Two Connected Learners #etmooc from Sheri Edwards on Vimeo.

And that’s what happens when you JOin Twitter (or #ETMOOC), Lurk around awhile, Learn a few things and spaces and tricks, and the Extend yourself into conversations and projects.

Think: What do you hope to do in the next year?