#DigiLit Organize Twitter PLN Lists

sundaydiglit

 

 

DigiLit Sunday

It’s Sunday!  DigiLit Sunday is a Sunday post on literacy, an invitation by Margaret Simon, to share literacy strategies and tools for the classroom. This week’s list of bloggers: Sunday, Aug 24, 2014

Question: My Twitter is overflowing – How do I manage it?

Where did my PLN go? Twitter is my go to place for resources and connections. As you gain followers and follow others, you Twitter feed will grow with wonders amazing: lessons, strategies, connections, questions, answers, resources, etc. And we want those literacy connections to be at the forefront…

Eventually, though, you’ll wonder where that original group of connections is in your Twitter stream. You’ll wonder where the key people’s tweets disappeared to. You’ll know you’re missing something on the topics of specific interest to you that those key people mostly tweet.

Yes, we’ve got #hashtags, but I there’s a conversation and stream of ideas from those connections that are near and dear to your heart– those whose ripples of information and conversation connect mostly with your [and their] situation?

How do you keep connected with those in addition to you regular stream?

Lists.

First of all, here are resources:

Here are the experts’ advice:

Twitter

Twitter Media

Mashable

Mashable: How To

Second, a quick over view:

Create a list

When logged in to Twitter, go to the gear icon and click Lists.

go to list

 

A list page will open, and you can create a list. Give it a name [can’t start with number].

create list button

create list

 

Note you can make it public or private as needed.

Now find people to add to your list. Search names or usernames.

find people

click gear to addClick the gear icon and choose add or remove from list.

find and add to list

When in your twitter stream, just click a name.

click name

Their profile will pop up — click the gear and add.

gear in profile

Of course, you can delete lists as well.

Just click the icon in your profile. Choose your list by clicking the title.

choose list

click delete

Click delete.

Third, find and subscribe to lists.

Now that you know how to create, add to, and delete a list — there’s a great option to get started with a pre-made list. For example, I wanted a list of Language Arts Teachers, and wouldn’t you know it, Judy Artz has a list. How do I know?

When at Judy’s profile, click more –> Lists.

judy profile

See all her lists, and click the name of the one of interest.

judy language arts list

click subscribeClick subscribe.

unsubscribeNotice that the button changes to “unsubscribe from list” in case you need to.

Notice that you can see all the members — with a gear icon by their name so you can add them to the list directly from her list.

see followers and add to list thereNotice it shows who you already follow.  And you can see the list of subscribers as well with the same information — add to list; see who you’re following.

subscribed to members of

Finally, use your lists.

Now that you’ve got the lists relevant to your PLN and your interests, just click the name of the list to see the tweets from those members. You don’t even need to follow a person to add them to the list, but usually you do.

Go forth and add a few manageable canals to your Twitter stream.

Back at your lists, you will find the lists to which you have subscribed, and the lists to which you have been added as a member!

twitter list stream

What Twitter organizing strategies do you use to keep focused on literacy strategies?

PLN Challenge: How do I organize?

diigo education pioneer teacherchallenge-1mhy8u5Learning with the new Build Your PLN Edublogs Teacher Challenge creates many resources I may forget. Sarah Wooden commented how it’s not easy to keep track of every thing. Sue Waters shares how to keep track of fellow bloggers and comments through an RSS Reader. But what about all the tools and strategies we learn about– the tool link, the how-tos, and the examples? How do we remember where to find those?

My own strategy is to use Diigo, a social bookmarking and highlighting tool that allows me to create lists and groups to which I add bookmarks to those websites I want to remember. I have a list that is just for Tools — Animoto, Wallwish, etc. I also may put how-to pages there, or in my How-To List. I have lists for lessons, certain topics, specific tools (like Google Apps).

Now that I’ve got you thinking, Diigo has a free and premium version — and teachers should apply for the education version. My language arts students use Diigo for research, note-taking, and writing feedback and research sharing. Each class has their own private group, and we have one group for all our classes.

And I belong to several groups, including Classroom 20, Diigo in Education , and EdTechTalk. I’ve created a group for the Teacher Challenges, called “ebchallenge” if you decide to join Diigo. That way, our new PLN we are building can share resources with each other.

Remember, it’s easy as your ABCs.

Add a highlight to a webpage.

Bookmark to Diigo (into a group and/or list).

Comment in the webpage using the Sticky Note feature and in the description box about what you learned when you click bookmark.

Save.

From any connected computer, you can access your bookmarks and highlights with annotations (comments). You now have organized and saved all your precious research, tools, and learning !

Interested? Please join our PLN ebchallenge group: ebchallenge

Here’s the Diigo Vimeo overview:

Diigo V5: Collect and Highlight, Then Remember! from diigobuzz on Vimeo.

Diigo V5: Collect and Highlight, Then Remember! from diigobuzz on Vimeo.