#clmooc #k6diglit Invitation to Stay Connected

sundaydiglit

Margaret Simon asks a question: Tapping Student Connections

How do we tap into student interests and create online learning environments for them to connect to and learn from? 

That is the question for DigLit Sunday bloggers from Margaret Simon.  And I’ve written an invitation to stay connected as Middle School educators here. This post continues that invitation.

What about a hub — a blog of prompts for students?

One way I thought of is to form a group of Middle Level Educators who collaborate on a blog of prompts from which students respond, connect to other students, and perhaps plan collaboration on the prompts. The blog would be the hub of student choice, or teacher guidance, a Make Bank of our own. I created such a blog for us to develop to get us started and, for #clmooc-ers, to stay connected:

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Connect 2 Learn

If you’re already interested, here’s the spot to join by sending me an email: Contact Connect2Learn and choose “Facilitator Request” so I can add you to the blog as facilitator.

A bit more on Connect 2 Learn:

When we write, we often write first for ourselves to gather ideas [inside/personal], and then share and discuss with others [responsive/connective]. Next we may share out to inform [purposeful/informative/narrative], and we may also share out to  help others or make the world better [social action/argumentative/persuasive].

I thought perhaps these purposes would be good ways to organize the blog:

Do I want to be reflective / personal and perhaps share that with others [responsive]?

Do I want to take what I know, add it to others idea’s? [responsive]

Do I want to share information or a story? [purposeful]

Do I want to make the world better? [social action]

Of course, these are recursive — each of us moves through these frames of writing, these frames of thinking about writing — as we develop our projects.  These frames are not my ideas, but rather are the work of Liz Stephens and Kerry Ballast (Liz Stephens and Kerry Ballast (2011). Using Technology to Improve Adolescent Writing: Digital Make-Overs for Writing Lessons) who present this new paradigm for writing lessons that includes the four frames, four lenses to view process writing and assignments. I thought they made a great way to organize our collaborative prompts.  [I’ve written about this here and here [scroll down].

But: it would be our blog. Join, and help build it: Contact Connect2Learn and choose “Facilitator Request” so I can add you to the blog as facilitator.

But how do we discuss and plan our projects?

Many people have commented on how difficult it is to follow  threads of conversations — and find them again on Google Plus. So I researched and discovered another platform — MightyBell that serves as a focal point for general members, allows for smaller communities within the larger one [think planning projects with a team of educators], and even smaller circles of projects. That sounded like a possibility for better conversation and collaboration. Of course we would always stay connected throughout the year with #clmooc.

So I created Connect in the Middle community at Mightybell with a circle for planning the collaborative blog called Connect 2 Learn, same name as the blog.

An invitation

Please consider joining with myself and others — for planning and collaboration, join these two communities:

Connect in the Middle community

Connect 2 Learn Circle

and the collaborative blog hub:

Connect 2 Learn  Contact Connect2Learn

Hopefully, these will help us stay connected as Middle School educators, planning projects with and for our students, to identify the entry points for play and learning, and  to lead them towards a connected learning path.

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#clmooc Invitation Middle School Educators

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An Invitation to Connect Middle School Educators
Teachers, Principals, Librarians, etc.

As a member of #clmooc, I created two collaborative spaces: Connect in the Middle and Connect 2 Learn to provide a space for middle school educators to connect and plan for their own and their students’ collaborative efforts. This platform is free up to 100 members, so it can help us stay connected as a a group.

I teach language arts to grades 6, 7, 8 in a very rural area of Wa State. 

Join me in Connect in the Middle https://mightybell.com/communities/connect-in-the-middle
Connect in the Middle provides a space for middle school educators to connect and plan for their own and their students collaborative efforts

Our goal is to establish a community where members can connect to share ideas, or form a circle within the community to plan collaborative projects or other needed discussions (CCSS, for example.).

A circle within the Connect in the Middle MightyBell Community is Connect 2 Learn on Mightybell https://mightybell.com/spaces/85832 

Middle School Educators who would like to connect classrooms through prompts on a collaborative blog can discuss that idea here
I teach language arts to grades 6 7 8 in a rural are of Wa State. I would like my students to collaborate or connect with other students in authentic writing to guide them in online citizenship and in their own passions through their own writing and making.

I blog here whatelse.edublogs.org/
And created this blog
connect2learn.edublogs.org as the connective blog for students to find tasks of interest to them to connect, perhaps collaborate, with other students.

This space provides a place to discuss how to develop these connections and prompts.

I hope you join.

Resilience

Resilience: A ReMix of “Bent But Not Broken


Created with Haiku Deck, the free presentation app

Resilience. For yourself. For your students.

My friend Susan Spellman-Cann created the HaikuDeck and a blogpost, “Bent But Not Broken” to guide us in resilience.

She says, ” We need to see students as they should be and help them to see what they are capable of becoming. We can help them in becoming more resilient by being that role model for them.”

It’s not easy, especially if you teach middle school, because they do know everything already. But we see their hearts, their unseen acts of kindness, and their ability to look to each other for support. We think our “role modeling” is for naught at the time, but through the course of the year with them, you’ll hear them remind you, “But you said…” as they repeat your self-talk modeling when you, the teacher, need it. They hear. So be a role model for resilience.

Here are more resources from Susan:

Resilience is hope, and something I’ve been thinking of for a while — how do I help students cope and learn, to be resilient in the face of so many obstacles. I am even adapting a BIE project on resilience that I call I Stand Eight, which I hope to implement next fall.

Thanks, Susan for adding to the conversation on helping students live learning.

What other strategies for teaching resilience are there?