#140WC Welcome Challenge #clmooc #etmooc

A Challenge

On November 10th, 2014 I made a commitment to myself and invited others to join — teachers, students, bloggers. The commitment? Write 140 words each day — 140 words more or less — but write — blog — everyday.  I wrote that challenge here: #140WC and continued each day since: #140WC posts.  Urbie Delgado has joined the challenge and posts regularly at Puzzling Mix.

#140WC

 

 

Why? 

Everyday I consider things I see, hear, read…. but they’re passing thoughts. So, why not take time each day and write. 140 words on some of these:

Do you gather ideas throughout the day?

Do you have ideas that meander through your mind?

Do you want to blog more but your topic hides?

Do you ever think, “I wish I’d written that down….?”

Then this challenge is for you!

Write 140 words each day! [or a little more or less — a thought each day!]

  • Share your ideas.
  • Share a link.
  • Share your lesson.
  • Share your reflection.
  • Share your questions.
  • Share your answers.
  • Share a tweet with your input
  • Share a blog with your insights
  • Share to carry on the conversation….

The benefit?

In a 140 words each day, your journey is formed, your ideas saved, your reflection framed.

In 140 words each day, your writing flows and grows more clearly.

In 140 words in day, your past and path is forged forward.

Challenge:

Will you join?  How about once a week? a month? 140 Word Count — you can do it!


Link to #140WC Badge

Join the #140WC Challenge

#clmooc #k6diglit Invitation to Stay Connected

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Margaret Simon asks a question: Tapping Student Connections

How do we tap into student interests and create online learning environments for them to connect to and learn from? 

That is the question for DigLit Sunday bloggers from Margaret Simon.  And I’ve written an invitation to stay connected as Middle School educators here. This post continues that invitation.

What about a hub — a blog of prompts for students?

One way I thought of is to form a group of Middle Level Educators who collaborate on a blog of prompts from which students respond, connect to other students, and perhaps plan collaboration on the prompts. The blog would be the hub of student choice, or teacher guidance, a Make Bank of our own. I created such a blog for us to develop to get us started and, for #clmooc-ers, to stay connected:

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Connect 2 Learn

If you’re already interested, here’s the spot to join by sending me an email: Contact Connect2Learn and choose “Facilitator Request” so I can add you to the blog as facilitator.

A bit more on Connect 2 Learn:

When we write, we often write first for ourselves to gather ideas [inside/personal], and then share and discuss with others [responsive/connective]. Next we may share out to inform [purposeful/informative/narrative], and we may also share out to  help others or make the world better [social action/argumentative/persuasive].

I thought perhaps these purposes would be good ways to organize the blog:

Do I want to be reflective / personal and perhaps share that with others [responsive]?

Do I want to take what I know, add it to others idea’s? [responsive]

Do I want to share information or a story? [purposeful]

Do I want to make the world better? [social action]

Of course, these are recursive — each of us moves through these frames of writing, these frames of thinking about writing — as we develop our projects.  These frames are not my ideas, but rather are the work of Liz Stephens and Kerry Ballast (Liz Stephens and Kerry Ballast (2011). Using Technology to Improve Adolescent Writing: Digital Make-Overs for Writing Lessons) who present this new paradigm for writing lessons that includes the four frames, four lenses to view process writing and assignments. I thought they made a great way to organize our collaborative prompts.  [I’ve written about this here and here [scroll down].

But: it would be our blog. Join, and help build it: Contact Connect2Learn and choose “Facilitator Request” so I can add you to the blog as facilitator.

But how do we discuss and plan our projects?

Many people have commented on how difficult it is to follow  threads of conversations — and find them again on Google Plus. So I researched and discovered another platform — MightyBell that serves as a focal point for general members, allows for smaller communities within the larger one [think planning projects with a team of educators], and even smaller circles of projects. That sounded like a possibility for better conversation and collaboration. Of course we would always stay connected throughout the year with #clmooc.

So I created Connect in the Middle community at Mightybell with a circle for planning the collaborative blog called Connect 2 Learn, same name as the blog.

An invitation

Please consider joining with myself and others — for planning and collaboration, join these two communities:

Connect in the Middle community

Connect 2 Learn Circle

and the collaborative blog hub:

Connect 2 Learn  Contact Connect2Learn

Hopefully, these will help us stay connected as Middle School educators, planning projects with and for our students, to identify the entry points for play and learning, and  to lead them towards a connected learning path.

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#clmooc Invitation Middle School Educators

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An Invitation to Connect Middle School Educators
Teachers, Principals, Librarians, etc.

As a member of #clmooc, I created two collaborative spaces: Connect in the Middle and Connect 2 Learn to provide a space for middle school educators to connect and plan for their own and their students’ collaborative efforts. This platform is free up to 100 members, so it can help us stay connected as a a group.

I teach language arts to grades 6, 7, 8 in a very rural area of Wa State. 

Join me in Connect in the Middle https://mightybell.com/communities/connect-in-the-middle
Connect in the Middle provides a space for middle school educators to connect and plan for their own and their students collaborative efforts

Our goal is to establish a community where members can connect to share ideas, or form a circle within the community to plan collaborative projects or other needed discussions (CCSS, for example.).

A circle within the Connect in the Middle MightyBell Community is Connect 2 Learn on Mightybell https://mightybell.com/spaces/85832 

Middle School Educators who would like to connect classrooms through prompts on a collaborative blog can discuss that idea here
I teach language arts to grades 6 7 8 in a rural are of Wa State. I would like my students to collaborate or connect with other students in authentic writing to guide them in online citizenship and in their own passions through their own writing and making.

I blog here whatelse.edublogs.org/
And created this blog
connect2learn.edublogs.org as the connective blog for students to find tasks of interest to them to connect, perhaps collaborate, with other students.

This space provides a place to discuss how to develop these connections and prompts.

I hope you join.

#clmooc Play Revision

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REVISING a Blog I Started Last Year

Revision Steps — ideas so far

1.  Starting: A reflection and revision of my work last year in the post: Play is the Game

2. Adding Meme Activities to Connect2Learn Blog

a. Memes as Avatars [revising an old activity ]
b. Memes  Activities which link to Mindy A Early’s meme activities

3. I am looking for any middle school teachers who want to connect and develop the Connect 2 Learn blog.

An Invitation

As I said in Part 1:

So, I’d like to invite the middle school teachers to help me with this, if it fits their interests. We’ve all got our own standards to meet, but we’ve learned through CLMOOC that those can be met in a variety of ways, and that connections and collaborations deepen the learning of more than finite objectives.

So, what if a group of middle school teachers collaborated on a blog of makes and prompts that promote the Connected Learning Principles through the lens of the Thinking Frames? The blog would suggest the prompts and makes; the students could write about their projects in their own blogs or Google Docs [ and collaborate in Google Docs or Wikis ], and share their play/work in comments on the blog prompt.

Whether we incorporate prompts from Digital.IsCLMOOC Make Bank, or our own prompts, the blog will be the hub for our connected classrooms. Here’s what it might look like:  Connect 2 Learn Blog, Connected Learning and Writing FramesGuidelines. I’m hoping a middle school community blog will provide the hub for connected learning and play with writing [in all its forms].

I’m excited to be more playful this year, to bring joy back to the classroom. I want my students to expand their worldview carefully and become more digitally literate. And maybe together we can make it “Game on!”

How about you?

Will you Connect 2 Learn to keep the game going?

#clmooc Starts Monday June 16

clmooccorinnethomsenmemesquarplc1It’s Monday (or almost) and time to play!

Build your personal learning network.

Lurk and learn from others who are creating and making.

Join in and make yourself or make together.

Share and use ideas in the Make Bank.

Read what others are doing.

Learn Connected Learning Principles:

Openly-networked, Interest-powered, Shared-purpose, Academically oriented, Peer-supported, Production-centered Connected Learning Massive Open Online Collaboration  #CLMOOC

What does this mean?

 
From Kevin Hodgson [ Dogtrax ] on Flickr CC 2.0:

Join the fun! How? Walk with me…

 

Or take a stroll through Blendspace:

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#TFotoFri Teacher Flickr Friday Photo Group: You’re Invited!

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TFotoFri

Are you an Educator with an eye for the perfect snapshot? Or not?  But you do notice! All educators notice the little things, and the big things, that make a difference in our daily lives.

Would you like to join a group of educators who have learned the joy of sharing those small things [or big things] through photos?

Don’t panic! It’s not 365 photos!  It’s a Friday Foto Group called TFotoFri, Teacher Photo Fridays!

 

Ways to Share

You can write about your photo in a blog post, upload your picture on Flickr, or do both. Other ways to share? Let us know!

Hashtag #TFotoFri (Short for Teacher’s Foto Friday Challenge)
Use the tag on your Flickr photos.
Tell others about your post by using the tag on Twitter.

Relax
Relax and enjoy the photo challenge. When it gets too challenging, when your week is too busy and you don’t get it done, don’t feel pressure or guilt. We are educators, for heaven’s sake, so we all understand how that will inevitably be part of the challenge!

This year, we’ve added an idea — and that’s all it is; we love all your photo ideas.  Here it is:

Texture, Mixture, and Me

#TFotoFri Crew: Time for an upgrade and renewal! Our photos are fantastic; we’ve shared important engagement, creativity, happiness, structure, metaphor, groups, and collaboration within our lives. How about a new twist? Basically, it’s the same with a new name: Texture, Mixture, and Me.

What are the textures of your lives: appearance, character, consistency, quality of elements. What are the mixtures that make things interesting: mixes of differences? What is the “Me” of you this year: your art, visuals, hobbies, interests, etc? As always, this is flexible; include your photos from other groups if it fits better.  And, Thank You for sharing!

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History of #TFotoFri:

Inspired by a wonderful summer of photo sharing with #JJAProject, Denise and Sheri started this group for educators who are interested in sharing a photo each Friday. The photo you share can be personal or professional, taken anytime during the week and posted as close to Friday as you can. Here are the posts that inspired us to create this group: Denise and Sheri.

Please join us!   Join here:  TFotoFri, Teacher Photo Fridays!

Building Neighborhoods #etmooc #midleved : an invitation

 

We’re building a new neighborhood. Want to visit for a while?

As I learn more about PLNs through #etmooc, especially from @bhwilkoff, I realize I have a responsibility to help find and support the sub-committees that have a common focus.  Ben Wilkoff calls these sub-committees “neighborhoods.” These neighborhoods support each other in efforts to transform education, to make changes for our students’ futures.

The people listed in the image at left are connections I’ve recently made through ETMOOC  blogging, Google Plus, and Twitter. The educators are passionate middle level educators — teaching students in grades 5-8 (10-14 years of age). From their tweets and blogs I am learning more about educational technology and student engagement.

As a middle level educator, I find we have needs that differ than other levels. So, I’d like to invite middle level educators to connect in order to support our efforts to develop curriculum, pedagogy, and strategies to infuse technology and student engagement through other strategies, such as project/problem/passion-based education or the #geniushour. I appreciate the inspiration received from my friend, Denise Krebs, a fellow middle level educator in our neighborhood.

What if we connect and reflect together via Google+, Twitter, and blogs? We can add common documents and resources to the Connect In The Middle wiki and share resources in this group Diigo. We can connect our blogs, and reflect/comment on our questions and solutions together. Perhaps we can design student projects that connect these middle school students in a safe environment as they apply their digital citizenship to complete these projects.

The possibilities are endless, and involvement would be only as needed for each of us. Some might visit for a while; others might connect more fully, and some visit occasionally.  After all, we would be building a neighborhood that we visit for different purposes.

The first questions I’m considering, based on the first week of ETMOOC are:

    • How important is connected learning? Why?
    • Is it possible for our classrooms to support this kind of learning? If so, how?
    • What skills and literacies are necessary for connected learning?
    • How do we develop these?

Please read my responses here: Connected In The Middle Post. Do you have ideas about these questions? What are your questions? How can we help each other?

Please consider joining the conversation / connections for middle level educators to act on the conversations in ETMOOC and beyond.

To build your middle level neighborhood, please follow these educators who have inspired me this week.

Laura Gilchrist ‏ @LauraGilchrist4

Bernice Homel ‏ @BHomel1

Gallit Zvi ‏ @gallit_z

Rhoni McFarlane ‏ @rhonimcfarlane

Scott Hazeu ‏ @scotthazeu

Laura Coughlin ‏ @CoughlinLaura

Ben Wilkoff @bhwilkoff

Joy Kirr ‏ @JoyKirr

Lorraine Boulos ‏ @RaineCB

If you would like to join the middle level neighborhood, please comment below, and join the Connect In The Middle wiki.

Thank you, @grammasheri and welcome to the Connect in the Middle Neighborhood !