Whose image is it?

burroughsI love poster images and inspirational quotes. Sometimes they just make my day or encourage me to keep going. Images create emotional responses and so are a powerful addition to our communications. But whose images do we use?

I favorited an inspirational image this morning on Twitter, and it led me on a journey:

  • Image Search
  • Copyright and Creative Commons
  • Citations
  • So

Image Search

Twitter is a wonderful place to share, and of course we Tweet, reTweet and Favorite to share back to our Personal Learning Network [PLN]. But what if I want to use that image in a post? Do I have permission? First, as I usually do, I asked my peep if she had created the image. She didn’t know the source, which is common in Twitterverse because we like to share a good thing. But I really did like the image and wanted to know if I could use it.  Fortunately, Google provides an image search:

googleimageIn the Google Search page, chose “images” to open the image search. I downloaded the image and dragged it into the search bar.

 

 

firstmoungsearch Here you see the results, including a name “eric moung,” which is a first clue. I clicked on the first unannoted image hoping it would take me to the original image, but that site did not know the source.

So I clicked on the second unannotated image which brought me to a post on aDigitalBoom which provided the information about the original image. The original image is a copyrighted avatar created by Soul Division Studies for the singer Eric Moung, who is credited as the “Voice of Soul Division.”

But what about the annotated image? Had the message creator received permission and created a Creative Commons image I could use? For this I went back to my original search results and clicked “All Sizes” to find all the images like the one for which I had searched.

allsizesmoung

 

There were many. So I started a “time” search —

 

I searched by year and then my month in 2014 until I found the first instance, May 1,2014-Jun 1, 2014 (see second menu in image).

timesearchmoung

 

 

 

 

 

I found the image on Facebook where Global Peace and Unity had shared Fractal Enlightenment‘s photo, dated April 28,  in which the post credited the artist Eric Moung. I also found a pin image on Pinterest uploaded about the same time by clicking on one of the searched images leading to weheartit.  None of those links shared who created to annotated image.

Copyright and Creative Commons

So does the annotated image represent Copyright Fair Use ?  That’s not for me to say, but without permission, I will honor the artist’s copyright.

According to Copyright Basics, a publication of the United States Copyright Office:

Copyright protection subsists from the time the work is cre­
ated in fixed form. The copyright in the work of authorship
immediately becomes the property of the author who cre­
ated the work. Only the author or those deriving their rights
through the author can rightfully claim copyright.

I have many images online with a Creative Commons license, but many that are personal are copyrighted, and some are licensed as re-useable, but not re-mixable or adaptable. That’s the beauty of a Creative Commons license: choose what fits, and honor those licenses. According to the Creative Commons mission:

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.

Be sure to learn about the Open Policy Network  and how it works. Begin to choose and use Creative Commons licenses. And educate your students and families about copyright and creative commons.

 Citations

I teach sixth through eighth grades, and although my students don’t often carry the expectation through to their personal online presence, at school, my students know to credit the source, and to use only Creative Commons or Public Domain images. If students find an image or chart/diagram whose license they are unsure of or is copyrighted, we visit WikiMedia Commons or Search.CreativeCommons using keywords to find alternative images. And we still cite these sources. This year we began using EasyBib or Citation Machine as a citation maker for our work. There are others. Previously, we simply linked to the URL; that is a starting point — but we are learning to be more precise and professional.

Resources:

Edudemic’s Guides

Edutopia Posts

Copyright Resources [Electronic Frontier Foundation]

Kathy Schrock’s RIP: Respect Intellectual Property List

Get CC Saavy [P2PU]

ReadWriteThink: Students as Creators/Exploring Copyright

Copyright / Copyleft Wikispaces

So

Whether images or content, cite your sources. Use image search to discover the original artist and their permissions. Find an alternative image that allows reuse.

My husband says this will be the most boring, unread post I’ll write because no one pays attention. Perhaps he’s right, but I’ve discovered my next year’s homework assignments. I don’t usually assign homework — my student’s have lives and chores and sports to worry about. However, sharing citizenship responsibilities about the use of content and images is something worth sharing with families. And students will learn more by teaching them to someone else.

I’d like to thank @bethhill2829 Bethany Hill for leading me on this journey today. I’ve found resources and lessons to share with my PLN and students as I refine my fair use of intellectual property.

What are your favorite resources on copyright, copyleft, and Creative Commons, and how do you teach these to students and their families? And remember to ask: Whose image is it?


Burroughs Quote Source:

“Nothing_exists_until_or_unless_it_is_observed.” Columbia World of Quotations. Columbia University Press, 1996. 07 Jun. 2014. <Dictionary.comhttp://quotes.dictionary.com/Nothing_exists_until_or_unless_it_is_observed>.

Image created with Visual Poetry and posted on Instagram using original photography.

Other images: Screenshots of search.

 

Digital Literacy: Ownership #etmooc

Who owns our data?

Our School

Our school encourages in our daily work and curricula a continuous emphasis on digital citizenship and digital safety; we practice citizenship in our classrooms, virtual and in reality. This discussion and practice we hope will carry over into our students’ personal choices, online and and off. In addition, our school board believes and is adopting a school policy that explains that students own the copyright to all their work. Our Google Apps for Education allows for transfer of their data to them should they choose to continue their work with their personal accounts after their graduation. Student accounts in online networks do not refer to students’ real names; students choose pseudonyms. We balance digital literacy, privacy, and transparency.

We are still dealing with the ownership of educator’s work, since many of our staff work well beyond the time to which our contract employs us. For innovation and creativity to develop to implement the many requirements related to teaching and learning (learning and teaching standards), the intellectual work of the staff must be acknowledged and respected. We must balance the work asked of the district during district time, and the work created by staff on their own time for the benefit of student learning and professional development.

Apps for Networking and Sharing

After the amazing presentation by Audrey Watters (Hack Education and  @audreywatters ), I now will add these ideas to our curricula:

  • Terms of Service Understanding: Read your TOS — who owns your data — you or the application?
  • Ownership and Portability: Who owns your data — Can you delete it? Can you transfer it? Can you download it into a human readable format?
  • Curation: How do you track your own footprints? How do you manage your digital data — your footprints back to you? How do you create value in what you create?

I have always skimmed the Terms of Service in the online applications I use, looking for who owns the data. We need to share this with our students. Audrey provides links to various sites that clarify and support ideas on ownership, transparency, anonymity, and privacy. How do we guide students to curate and own the information generated by them? How do we do this for ourselves as teachers? And how do we encourage the concept that we should control our own data? What data are we talking about?

We need to think about JackieGerstein‘s  statement in this tweet: “Education decision makers use data to do things to students rather than empowering students with the data to do for themselves.” What data do the students want? What data will help them? What conversation will we have in our classrooms about this?

Data Collection

Why do we collect data? Why do we share? We are social beings and we communicate and create together. We “collect to recollect,” as Audrey puts it. We collect to revalue what we value. And that is key: adding, sharing, creating value for the communities, the neighborhoods of our real or virtual relationships and associations. Our challenge is to curate what we create and share, and maintain the value we create without giving it to those agencies that exploit what we have chosen to create and share.

Data Ownership

Whether a student or teacher, you create data — your work, your tests, your words, your numbers, your ideas. It’s yours. Or is it? What do you think?

In my mind, I am reminded of Abraham Lincoln’s words: I believe each individual is naturally entitled to do as he pleases with himself and the fruit of his labor, so far as it in no wise interferes with any other mans rights.   The inference of that quote is that who we are and what we do belongs to us. Now we have a responsibility to maintain that right, as we have always had the responsibility to manage who we are and what we do in ways that promote the common good.

How do we do so? How do I do so?

  1. Document that which is ours (mine).
  2. Create more value than we (I) take.
  3. Curate, declare, and manage our (my) data.
  4. Model for others.
  5. Accept and encourage Terms of Service that acknowledge our (my) ownership of our (my) data,  its use, and its portability.
  6. Expect that the products we (I) use also creates value rather than simply takes value from us (me).
  7. If an adult, be transparent in who we are (I am). [Students may maintain anonymity with pseudonyms]
  8. Educate others on their own (my) rights.
  9. Educate politicians.

Audrey gave us some places to help us help:

Ghostery: https://www.ghostery.com/
FERPA: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html
Quantified Self Movement:  http://quantifiedself.com/
Locker Project:  http://lockerproject.org/
Electronic Frontier:  https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere

Flickr CC by giulia.forsythe

 What do you think? How will you monitor and keep ownership of your data?

Tracking Your Own Story: Memolane #etmooc

Have you thought of what your own footprint looks like? Or the story it tells?

Imagine students curating their footprints — and able to see how their world reaches back through their connections?

In the Digital Story Telling review, I clicked a link to Memolane and followed the directions.  The embed code doesn’t work here, but here’s the link to the ETMOOT lane I created. While this would not be a choice for younger students, it might be good for high school students to visualize their contributions.

Do any of you use Memolane ?

Could we begin an educator presence there?

Who else would like to try?  Please share here and at our #ETMOOC neighborhood.

 

 

Connected Educator Blogging Challenge

Are you hesitant to join in the global conversations around the world? Are you overwhelmed by the amount of information flowing towards you?

One way to join the conversation and sort out the information is to start a blog to reflect on and share the ideas to which you connect. You just might help someone else be less overwhelmed with what you add to the blogging community. And fortunately for you Sue Waters at Edublogs has a step by step challenge started. You can learn on your own following her easy-to-follow directions. From creating a blog, to setting up pages, posting, and commenting, she provides clear, written, and visual directions for you. It’s Connected Educator’s Month, and Edublogs always participates in events that promote connection and innovation.

So get your fingers stretched and ready to type. It’s easy. One of the most important activity challenges is setting up an “About Page.” I know; you are overwhelmed; you’re not sure you want your name out there. But remember, when we research topics, the first thing we do is check the authenticity of the author. We want to know who’s writing. And if you want to stretch your network, readers need to know who you are so they can contact you to collaborate on projects.

It’s time to start creating your digital footprint. As a teacher, it’s important to be a role model for your students. In this very public, online world, we teachers have a responsibility to model and teach digital writing and citizenship. Your About Page lets readers who find your blog and your parents and community know who you are.You model the transparency and civility for this digital world.

So I encourage you to start blogging by following the wonderful ways to engage and create in the Edublogs Teacher Challenge. And please, use your real name and tell about yourself on an “About Page.”

Remember, wherever you write on the Internet, it is your footprint:

A blog post and comment is your footprint…

a path back to you…

prepare your path wisely.

Internet Safety: Four Tips if Cyberbullied

What happens if you are cyberbullied? What should you do?

Cyberbullying is when someone contacts you online or includes online content about you that is mean, threatening, or hurtful.  Always tell a trusted adult.
1. Ignore it. Don’t respond.

2. Save the evidence (text message, IM, Facebook page, etc.). Take a screenshot, if possible.
3. Tell a trusted adult: your parent, a teacher, etc.
4. If necessary, contact the administrators of the site or contact the authorities.

Our students have been learning from Netsmartz on how to be safe online. We’ve watched and discussed many videos and scenarios. Last Friday, we reviewed the main points. Then we left the classroom with partners, pads, and pens for a “Walk ‘n Talk.”  Partners walked, talked, and wrote about the issues of cyberbullying, creating scripts to share tips with other kids.

Back in the classroom, each partner pairs prepared and videoed their skits, sometimes calling their teacher (Code name Shee) in an improptu part in their skits. In one class period we reviewed tips, wrote scripts, and videoed the skits.

Enjoy our work and learn what to do if you are cyberbullied:


Link to full screen here.

Listen to the engagement. Think about the verbs, “the DOing” by students to learn and understand what to do if one is cyberbullied:

Understand the content.
List the content.
Explain the content.
Organize the content.
Share and edit the content.
Collaborate to share and edit content.
Plan, design, and produce the content.

These are essential skills of the 21st Century. The tool engaged students and allowed application and practice of the skills.

What did you learn?  What was the most important tip?
 How did we do?

Be sure to check out  Netsmartz for more information on Internet Safety.

cross posted at  Ms Edwards and Eagles Write

This is a school related site so please respect others and comment appropriately. Please contact Ms Edwards if you have any questions or need to report any inappropriate activity. Thank you. Reflect Curiosity and Wonder… Go boldly and scatter seeds of kindness…