Whose image is it?

burroughsI love poster images and inspirational quotes. Sometimes they just make my day or encourage me to keep going. Images create emotional responses and so are a powerful addition to our communications. But whose images do we use?

I favorited an inspirational image this morning on Twitter, and it led me on a journey:

  • Image Search
  • Copyright and Creative Commons
  • Citations
  • So

Image Search

Twitter is a wonderful place to share, and of course we Tweet, reTweet and Favorite to share back to our Personal Learning Network [PLN]. But what if I want to use that image in a post? Do I have permission? First, as I usually do, I asked my peep if she had created the image. She didn’t know the source, which is common in Twitterverse because we like to share a good thing. But I really did like the image and wanted to know if I could use it.  Fortunately, Google provides an image search:

googleimageIn the Google Search page, chose “images” to open the image search. I downloaded the image and dragged it into the search bar.

 

 

firstmoungsearch Here you see the results, including a name “eric moung,” which is a first clue. I clicked on the first unannoted image hoping it would take me to the original image, but that site did not know the source.

So I clicked on the second unannotated image which brought me to a post on aDigitalBoom which provided the information about the original image. The original image is a copyrighted avatar created by Soul Division Studies for the singer Eric Moung, who is credited as the “Voice of Soul Division.”

But what about the annotated image? Had the message creator received permission and created a Creative Commons image I could use? For this I went back to my original search results and clicked “All Sizes” to find all the images like the one for which I had searched.

allsizesmoung

 

There were many. So I started a “time” search —

 

I searched by year and then my month in 2014 until I found the first instance, May 1,2014-Jun 1, 2014 (see second menu in image).

timesearchmoung

 

 

 

 

 

I found the image on Facebook where Global Peace and Unity had shared Fractal Enlightenment‘s photo, dated April 28,  in which the post credited the artist Eric Moung. I also found a pin image on Pinterest uploaded about the same time by clicking on one of the searched images leading to weheartit.  None of those links shared who created to annotated image.

Copyright and Creative Commons

So does the annotated image represent Copyright Fair Use ?  That’s not for me to say, but without permission, I will honor the artist’s copyright.

According to Copyright Basics, a publication of the United States Copyright Office:

Copyright protection subsists from the time the work is cre­
ated in fixed form. The copyright in the work of authorship
immediately becomes the property of the author who cre­
ated the work. Only the author or those deriving their rights
through the author can rightfully claim copyright.

I have many images online with a Creative Commons license, but many that are personal are copyrighted, and some are licensed as re-useable, but not re-mixable or adaptable. That’s the beauty of a Creative Commons license: choose what fits, and honor those licenses. According to the Creative Commons mission:

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.

Be sure to learn about the Open Policy Network  and how it works. Begin to choose and use Creative Commons licenses. And educate your students and families about copyright and creative commons.

 Citations

I teach sixth through eighth grades, and although my students don’t often carry the expectation through to their personal online presence, at school, my students know to credit the source, and to use only Creative Commons or Public Domain images. If students find an image or chart/diagram whose license they are unsure of or is copyrighted, we visit WikiMedia Commons or Search.CreativeCommons using keywords to find alternative images. And we still cite these sources. This year we began using EasyBib or Citation Machine as a citation maker for our work. There are others. Previously, we simply linked to the URL; that is a starting point — but we are learning to be more precise and professional.

Resources:

Edudemic’s Guides

Edutopia Posts

Copyright Resources [Electronic Frontier Foundation]

Kathy Schrock’s RIP: Respect Intellectual Property List

Get CC Saavy [P2PU]

ReadWriteThink: Students as Creators/Exploring Copyright

Copyright / Copyleft Wikispaces

So

Whether images or content, cite your sources. Use image search to discover the original artist and their permissions. Find an alternative image that allows reuse.

My husband says this will be the most boring, unread post I’ll write because no one pays attention. Perhaps he’s right, but I’ve discovered my next year’s homework assignments. I don’t usually assign homework — my student’s have lives and chores and sports to worry about. However, sharing citizenship responsibilities about the use of content and images is something worth sharing with families. And students will learn more by teaching them to someone else.

I’d like to thank @bethhill2829 Bethany Hill for leading me on this journey today. I’ve found resources and lessons to share with my PLN and students as I refine my fair use of intellectual property.

What are your favorite resources on copyright, copyleft, and Creative Commons, and how do you teach these to students and their families? And remember to ask: Whose image is it?


Burroughs Quote Source:

“Nothing_exists_until_or_unless_it_is_observed.” Columbia World of Quotations. Columbia University Press, 1996. 07 Jun. 2014. <Dictionary.comhttp://quotes.dictionary.com/Nothing_exists_until_or_unless_it_is_observed>.

Image created with Visual Poetry and posted on Instagram using original photography.

Other images: Screenshots of search.

 

#napowrimo14 is what?

April is National Poetry Month

sponsored by the Academy of American Poets

What is poetry? What is a poem?

#napowrimo is National Poetry Writing Month!

started by poet Maureen Thorson

a challenge to write a poem a day

that’s write: 30 poems in 30 days 

14091_poetry2_bloom.002

Let it bloom !

Ready ? Set? Write !

Writer’s block?  Not sure what to do?

Try these:  Online Interactives from Read/Write/Think: Theme PoemsAcrostic PoemsDiamante Poems

or learn from poets how:

Instant Poetry Forms

Kinds of Poems by Kathi Mitchell

Ken Nesbitt’s Poetry4Kids

Giggle Poetry How To

Which kind fits you? Why did you chose it? Why is it poetry?

Write it up !

Draft your poem on your Kidblog  and edit. Let us know:

Which kind fits you? Why did you chose it? Why is it poetry?

Publish

 

Read it up!

Not sure you want to write a poem every day? How about reading one every day. Find one you like. Link to it in your Kidblog and let us know:

Which kind fits you? Why did you chose it? Why is it poetry?

A Poem a Day by GottaBook

Children’s Poetry Archive — hear poets read 

What do you notice?

Help document: Stuck on the questions: Which kind fits you? Why did you chose it? Why is it poetry?  review author craft in the help document.  Make two copies as directed and fill it out for a poem  your connect with.

Let’s discover:

What is poetry? What is a poem?

 

Teacher Resources

Quality Blogging & Commenting Audit Meme

Our students were thrilled this year with an award nomination, and many chose to write thank you comments to our nominator. Most were thoughtful responses that conveyed their appreciation; they wrote from the heart, which gave their writing voice.

Our goal is to write our best, to learn from even our best to improve our writing choices so our ideas are clear and concise.

Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano at Langwitches  invites us to evaluate our work to improve.

With that in mind, I reread several comments and wrote a sample one, a model to use with students. Using an anchor or model is a teaching strategy recommended to help improve writing.  With a model comment ready, I evaluated it based on a rubric. The rubric helps us to break down our writing so we can see the parts we did well and and the parts where we can improve.

The rubric (from Langwitches)

 

The model comment:

Dear Mrs. Nominator,

Thank you for nominating our blog. We are very proud and exited to be nominated for an award. Our class enjoys blogging because we can share ideas with other people. For instance, we can read and share with other students in the world. We learned to take notes and stuff and we learned strategies for ideas so we can write our own blog posts.  Finally, thank you again for nominating us!

Parts Done Well

Writing and Voice:

The paragraph was somewhat organized, adding voice by including feelings (very proud and excited [exited]) and details (“share ideas with other people”). The words chosen are an attempt to bring the content to life (“take notes and stuff” “can write our own blog posts”). Sentence fluency is mostly achieved (“For instance” “Finally”).

Content:

Connected to the post and added “simple” additions (“share ideas with other people” “we can read and share with other students in the world” “learned strategies for ideas” “own blog posts”), which shows the beginning evidence of knowledge/content.

Presentation:

Only a few spelling, sentence, and grammar errors restrict the flow of reading ( “exited” “take notes and stuff and we learned strategies”).

 

Therefore this comment flows between a 2 capable and 3 accomplished, which is a thoughtful response.

 

Parts to Improve:

To move to expert level on the rubric, the writer could:

Writing and Voice:

Write more than one paragraph which is organized into ideas, each followed by details of explanation. To add style, descriptions, imagery, or figurative language would add voice and interest. For instance — how proud were you? When I’m proud I feel light like a butterfly or warm like the sun. That would make the feeling “memorable, and bring the comment to life.”

Content:

Details were provided, and needed explanations; “stuff” could be explained with examples or experiences. For example, “take notes and summaries on our research to assist the composing of our posts” and “we learned strategies for ideas, such using our Google Docs organizer so we include details.” A link to those sample organizer, to sample notes/summaries would have added to the content, clarity, and relevant resources for the reader.

Summary

As indicated, the rubric helps us to break down our writing into parts, but good writing is not parts; it’s the meaning communicated to an audience for a purpose.

Donald Murray once said, “Writing is hard fun.” It’s hard to develop an idea thoroughly. It’s hard to add original ideas with a personal voice. It’s hard to go back and add details and voice. It’s hard to go back again and edit for spelling, grammar, and clarity. But when our writing is good— when a response is given back, that is fun, a feeling of satisfaction.

Even though students have the lessons and resources: figurative languageelaboration strategies, revision, and practice, writing is hard.

For this model, practicing the parts of writing brought it to capable  and almost through accomplished on the rubric. It was written to the audience for the purpose of expressing thanks. With more practice, this will improve to expert.

To continue this “audit meme,” I tag Denise KrebsAmy Cobb, and Tracy Watanabe to add to Silvia’s meme at Langwitches to help students and teachers improve the online blog and comment discourse.  Please use models (anchors) so we can all learn and practice from them.

For our class, we’re going to set one goal each, based on a self-assessment of our work. What one “part” would you recommend writers start practicing? What part of writing is hard for you, and what strategies do you use to overcome it? How do you know you’ve improved? How would you audit a post or comment?

Welcome New Bloggers

Please take time to welcome our new teacher bloggers from our school. They have set up and posted on their new blogs. Let’s congratulate them as they join us on our journey into the cloud.

Students:

Give them a safety tip on Internet use. What is the most important thing they should know about Internet safety? What would you like to them to write about on their class blog?

Student task:
  1. Click to a teacher blog.
  2. Congratulate their new blogging skills — design, content, ideas.
  3. Give them two safety tips on internet use, one of which is the one you think is most important.
  4. What would you like to know about their class? What should they post about? Help them get started 🙂
Teachers:
Remember how nervous you were when you started blogging?  What tips do you have that would help these new bloggers?  Thanks !

Our links:

Be the best blogger you can be by commenting on their blogs.
Cross-posted at Eagles Write for students and Ms Edwards

Family Friendly

Photo of Family Guitar Hero by Sheri Edwards

Photo of Family Guitar Hero by Sheri Edwards

This blog and our class blog are family friendly.

We welcome families to read and respond just as our students do. As part of our blogging challenge, teacher bloggers were asked to create a parent handout to guide families in the purposes of and the participation in our class blog.

What do families need to know?

The Class

Writing
Ms Edwards
Consider  Create  Connect  Collaborate

The Home Page and Blog

http://write.nsdeagles.org Home Page

http://whatelse.edublogs.org The Teacher Blog
http://eagleswrite.edublogs.org The Class Blog

The Purpose

Eagles Blog
Have you noticed the world has changed?
Or the changes in reading and writing?

  • We are Wandering Wordsmiths; Emerging Experts.
  • What else could we write? How else could we say it better?
  • Our Blog: a place to enhance written discourse and media citizenship among students.

Teaching and learning are social activities; today’s kids are connected in ways that no adult over twenty-five could have imagined just five years ago. Students today enjoy the connectedness of social networking; it is part of their very being. Our goal is to bring instruction into that cloud to teach the content required in ways that inspire online responsibility and ethics in this new, very public world.

What is a blog?

A log is like a journal, a place to express your ideas. A web-log is a journal on the world wide web (www), the Internet.  A blog is short for “web-log.” It’s purpose is to share ideas with others to add to an ongoing conversation about topics of interest to the “blogger.” Others then comment on that blog so they can add more to the conversation.
Why blog?
In this changed world, our students will be expected to participate online in responsible ways. Education now includes guiding students in this new read-write web. That’s right, the “internet” is now not only readable, it’s writable.

Our students learn to navigate safely and responsibly through the web by participating in blogs and wikis on topics of interest to them. They research and consider others’ ideas, create their own ideas on blogs, connect to others in comments, and collaborate to clarify and extend the conversation about their topics.

Through these connections, students apply their research and social skills to clearly write their ideas, converse with others in positive and supportive ways, and continue the conversation that adds knowledge and solutions to issues that concern them.
They create an online identity of which they can be proud citizens of this changed world.

How Can Families Participate?

Will You join us?

  • Read

http://whatelse.edublogs.org
The Teacher Blog
http://eagleswrite.edublogs.org
The Class Blog

  • Subscribesubscribeamail

In the left column, just enter your email address in the “Subscribe” area. You will receive an email when changes occur.

  • Read the blog’s pages for more information

thepages

  • Comment commentbox2

Comments continue the conversation. We love them!  Just click “Comments” under the title of the blog post. Please only use your first name.

Note to students:

Remember: A blog comment is your footprint… a path back to you… prepare your path wisely.

  • View Categoriescategories2

Look for your student’s name under categories to discover their posts. Just click the drop-down menu.

How will I introduce and welcome families?

First, my students will follow what they need to do to begin blogging. Expected homework is to share what they do, including the internet safety guidelines they follow.

Second, once students begin their own blogging, I will ask them to learn and explain the purpose and participation in their own words.

Third, I’ll share the handouts (see below) with families at parent conferences and as a homework task. I’ve always wanted to have an “Open House”  in our writing classroom, such that students prepare presentations to share with families any time they visit. We could schedule special “Open House Days” as well. Our regular lessons and projects would continue as the students of the attending families simply take them to their desk or computer and share the presentation of our work to them. This helps families and their schedules.

So, students:

What are you learning? What will you share? Prepare an agenda and artifacts. Let’s start our welcome to families to share our learning in writing class.

And families, What do you want to know and see? We look forward to learning your ideas as you read about ours.


The family handout:

parent blog info p1

parent info blog p2

Comment Considerations

Are you anxious to blog? Are you wondering how to start?

Helping Each Other

Think about it: you blog so others will learn from and share your ideas. Someone might add to your ideas. This happens through commenting. Think how excited you were when our mentors commented on our wiki. Just like everything else we do, if we want something, we need to give something.

So our challenge as beginning bloggers is to give comments to those blogs we read. If we want comments, we’ve got to give some. But what is a good comment?

A blog comment is your footprint…

leftfoot

a path back to you…

rightfoot

prepare your path wisely.

A great blog comment ?
How to write one:

•    What’s the best part of blogging?
•    Comments !

Let’s practice the best strategies for blogging by writing great comments.

1.   Be safe. Be kind. Provide no personal information and always be overly positive and kind. Remember our Netiquette.

2.    Read a post. Make a connection. While reading a blog and its comments, think about what you like, what you connect with. What idea most interested you? Be sure to read the other comments so you don’t repeat what someone has already said or asked. What was well-written and what ideas did you like? On what can you compliment the author? And, what can you add (see Number 4).


3.     Write a comment. Write it like a letter.

Example:

Hi ___[author name]___.

[Your Content– see next tip–4.]

Thank you.

4.     Share a compliment. Share a connection. Appreciate something specific. Compliment the idea, image, or other part you liked. Put it in quotes. Add new ideas with your connection (agree, disagree, experience, idea, link, question).  Add the idea you considered — your connection, agreement, disagreement (Although your idea is interesting, I’d like to add another side…). Do you have a link to share? an image? a question? How will you say it kindly?

5.    Check your ideas. Make them flow. Read your comment aloud to yourself; do the ideas flow one to another? Does it make sense?

6.   State your ideas and opinions only.  Write nothing personal. Review our Internet safety rules for keeping private and personal information off the internet. Netiquette

7.    Check spelling. Check punctuation. Edit your writing for spelling, punctuation, grammar, format so you are readable and believable, BEFORE you submit.

8.    Give one. Get oneIf you get a comment, be sure to comment back.

Remember: like handwriting, your comment represents  you!



What path will you take to write great comments? Which step to commenting do you think is the most important? Write a comment explaining the step or steps to commenting you think are most important. Have we forgotten anything?


Comment Poster

Steps to Great Comments

Steps to Great Comments

Netiquette: Every Day

Child using Laptop

“Our Blog: a place to enhance written discourse and media citizenship among students.”

What does that mean? How do we explain this to our students?

In our writing classroom, we review lessons from these sites:

Net Smartz
On Guard Online
I Keep Safe

I also added from Theresa’s Daily Question 2 Response, the following sites from which we can learn more:

http://www.commonsensemedia.org/

http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/Nine_Elements.html

And we apply them to our class behavior. The sixth grade wrote skits about bullying, which we then discussed for online safety. Daily we review or remind ourselves what is expected. We use code names, or pseudonyms, instead of our real names. Each student signs an agreement to practice our guidelines of Netiquette. Parents sign permission forms. Second to parent permission, is our daily practice in the classroom of how we treat each other: respectfully and kindly. And online we never reveal personally identifying information.

In my previous post (Ready), I discussed guidelines from other bloggers, which we will discuss and apply to our work as we begin blogging about issues important to us.

On our class blog, we will review:

Guidelines (our expectations, purpose, and safety rules)
Why Blog (pedagogy for wikis and blogs)

The design of our blog, with three columns, allows the guidelines to be posted in the left margin, as a frequent reminder to us. I will take the advice of my colleages (Mrs. Krebs, Ms Ratzel, and Mrs W) and ask students to demonstrate online their netiquette before they are allowed to create their own posts. We will comment first, then advance to posts. Students will draft first for approval second. Our students have been working in Google Apps and wikis since the beginning of the year; we have had no incidents of negative work beyond one negative comment at the first of the year by a fifth grader. We quickly discussed the issue in our writing classroom, and have not had another incident. The students understand how serious online citizenship is. At least in school, they practice our expectations.

We’re finishing up our current projects, and then plan to begin work on our blogs.  How do you introduce your students to media safety and global citizenship?

Students, when you read this, what would you mention about online safety?


Photo Credit:

Child Using Laptop: Flicker CC Attribution 2.0 By P i c t u r e Y o u t h http://www.flickr.com/photos/45688888@N08/4191381737/