#140WC Welcome Challenge #clmooc #etmooc

A Challenge

On November 10th, 2014 I made a commitment to myself and invited others to join — teachers, students, bloggers. The commitment? Write 140 words each day — 140 words more or less — but write — blog — everyday.  I wrote that challenge here: #140WC and continued each day since: #140WC posts.  Urbie Delgado has joined the challenge and posts regularly at Puzzling Mix.

#140WC

 

 

Why? 

Everyday I consider things I see, hear, read…. but they’re passing thoughts. So, why not take time each day and write. 140 words on some of these:

Do you gather ideas throughout the day?

Do you have ideas that meander through your mind?

Do you want to blog more but your topic hides?

Do you ever think, “I wish I’d written that down….?”

Then this challenge is for you!

Write 140 words each day! [or a little more or less — a thought each day!]

  • Share your ideas.
  • Share a link.
  • Share your lesson.
  • Share your reflection.
  • Share your questions.
  • Share your answers.
  • Share a tweet with your input
  • Share a blog with your insights
  • Share to carry on the conversation….

The benefit?

In a 140 words each day, your journey is formed, your ideas saved, your reflection framed.

In 140 words each day, your writing flows and grows more clearly.

In 140 words in day, your past and path is forged forward.

Challenge:

Will you join?  How about once a week? a month? 140 Word Count — you can do it!


Link to #140WC Badge

Join the #140WC Challenge

#ce14 #clmooc #etmooc Student Agency

thankyouclmooc

How do we help students develop the insight and initiative to be life-long, productive learners contributing to a better world? How do we develop student agency?

We know that motivation comes from a desire to learn, a purpose, an authentic interest, and a belief that success is possible. We know that learning is a social activity, that involvement with others enhances our reflection and goals. We’ve come to understand that reflection and feedback in authentic tasks in which we can improve and develop before publication or presentation builds motivation and agency.

So we also know that project-based learning can form a structure that develops the critical thinking and reflection habits that help learners make choices that guide improved learning.

But sometimes  these more open venues based on passion or student interest can flop. We need to understand that each student is at a different stage in their learning journey.  Here’s a review of this idea in an old video I made for #etmooc:

ETMOOC Slice from Sheri Edwards on Vimeo.

How do we provide the structure, the connection to the learning and the people, so students develop their voice to create their agency?

In this year’s #clmooc,  the organizers developed a support team to monitor and collaborate with members as an encouragement to participation. Because a sense of belonging and a connection with other members provides the support needed to make choices, and the freedom to choose what and when to participate allowed members to grow in their learning at their pace and for their purpose. People skipped some projects, and then became deeply involved in others. Learning is personal; learning is social. But the key to all of this really is based on what Daniel Pink suggests: People need autonomy, purpose, and mastery for motivation. If we review the literature on motivation and behavior, William Glasser’s work provides a background for autonomy, purpose, and mastery. Glasser suggests that we “behave” to meet the basic needs of freedom [autonomy], belonging [purpose], power [autonomy, mastery], and fun [purpose].

One of the best explanations of student agency connected to Glasser’s work is by Jackie Gerstein: Learner Agency, Technology, and Emotional Intelligence.

To build agency and voice in the connected learners of today, freedom to choose the learning is high on the list — autonomy and purpose.  But to make the choice, learners need to feel they belong and that they have the power to master the undertaking.  And our task is to be the support team, the guides to understand where and how the learners will take  that next step.

Both #clmooc and #etmooc provided the connections, collaboration, and support for their learners.  How do we translate that into a transformed classroom for today?

#DigiLit Sunday Blogging Challenge

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It’s Sunday!  DigiLit Sunday is a Sunday post on literacy, an invitation by Margaret Simon, to share literacy strategies and tools for the classroom. This week’s list of bloggers: Click here.

This week: Get started or restarted with  class blogging !

I want to dive in to blogging with my students. We blog with Kidblog (Grades 6, 7) and Edublog (Grade 8). Last year was our first real attempt at blogging, as you can see at Kidblogs. I’ve archived my Grade 8’s already.

First of all, why student blogging? Read what Connected Principal George Couros says: 5 Reasons Your Students Should Blog. The main reason for me is to help students become  lifelong, connected and civil learners in our connected world. The second reason is that student blogging fits right in with the Common Core State Standards. Technology is integrated throughout the standards [ See the integration here, by Beth Goth], and students who blog will be synthesizing texts and using media to analyze and discuss the issues about which they are studying. And they’ll be applying the writing  / communication skills needed to share those reflections, compositions, and arguments. And, learning to leave a positive digital footprint that leads right back to them.

How will I restart this blogging habit to develop both reading and writing skills?

I’ve started the Edublogs Teach Class Blogging Challenge to get myself blogging, connecting, conversing, ready to get my students going as well. My first post at my class blog, Eagles Write, shares my new theme and some great ideas by three other teacher bloggers. I’ll remember all the tricks and tips and trials of starting a blog, and be prepared for my students. I’ll learn a few new tricks.

How about you? Are you thinking about blogging with your students? A good way to start is with one class blog — that’s how I ease into blogging with my new class of sixth grade students each year.  So how about joining a challenge?  Try Edublogs or other challenges — or join a group of teachers and just start together!

How do you start something new with students? Challenge yourself!  Dive in. Learn with them.

 

 

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Another Resource:

Why teachers should blog by Matt Davis

#clmooc #light #constellation collaboration

 constellation_collaboration_flamingtext

Chief Astronaut: Kevin Hodgson

In Week 5, our challenge was light. How do we make and write with light? Under the inspiration of Kevin Hodgson , we were invited to remake the night sky with our own constellations and stories. How? He created directions, and let our imaginations take us to find in our #clmooc sky, the stars and stories hidden inside our own worlds. Click on the Star Sky Chart above to enjoy the constellation stories created by us.

Listen to the sounds of our space, courtesy of Kevin: G+Post. Kevin’s Post. Sound Cloud Audio.

Remember who we are.

We are stardust
Billion year old carbon
We are golden   …..   Joni Mitchell  on Rock.Genius

I think this is my favorite Make of all the #clmooc cycles. It brought people together with different tools. Problems arose and people hacked the solutions. For example, the story length was an issue, so members wrote blog posts of their stories. We were challenged, we were interested, we helped each other, and we created a sky worth viewing.  It brought us to places in memories and imaginings that we shared, like Jennifer Sharpe’s snowstorm and my Three Brown Dots. Thanks you Kevin.!

CLMOOC StarChart Complete

constellationThreeBrownDots

#clmooc #light Like Dandelions

Kim Douillard’s Sunshine on a Stem

Yes, I love these words, so powerful in their simplicity and wish. Interestingly, Kim doubted her metaphor, and shared it out to us for comment. When I read her post, I smiled, knowing that on my wall in my classroom is a tall poster that reads: Dandelions are my favorite flower because they refuse to stop growing. It’s there every year, for almost thirty years. So Kim, we educators love that metaphor!

This is Write with Light  [Storytelling with Light] Week 5 of #clmooc. And the first story I thought of was this metaphor, so I neoned it the best I could:

dandelion_kim1

But it just didn’t seem quite the light it needed. I live in a rural area, and there’s not much in supplies for glowing things, but I do have Keynote on my Mac.  And I know I can make words and images sparkle and shimmer with light with that app. So I created the video above [first in Keynote, then in iMovie, and on to YouTube. It’s not perfect, but it fits with light, sparkling dandelion constellations, and growing writers and tinkerers and explorers. Because I did those things to make it.

But the best Make on Like Dandelions is from Anna Smith with her Zeega.

Like Dandelions

► Play Zeega ►

by anna

 

Thanks #clmooc team this week [ the Maker Jawn Initiative from the Free Library of Philadelphia ], Kim Douillard, and Kevin Hodgson for inspiring this Write with Light.

How are you writing with light this week?

 

#clmooc #constellation Three Brown Dots

constellationThreeBrownDots

 

Three Brown Dots

of the Southern Sky

 To say the name is to say the story.

Three Brown Dots

Long ago when we people struggled for survival, we found a friend in the wolf. Yes, often he tagged along as we hunted, waiting for what we left, but soon we discovered that in the morning the fearsome creature left tracks to the new trails of the herd we followed. And soon our relationship grew, each helping the other feed our families.

Around the fire at night, we would see their eyes out in the tall grass or peeking by the pine.

The children would throw scraps to them, and soon they moved in closer, but not too close.

One day, our small one slept under the stars, and when she opened her eyes in the morning, there, a few feet from her, lay a small pup, his head facing her, nose pointing to her as its head rested between its front paws. Brown eyes blinked.

“Three brown dots,” she called out.

The pup’s tail curled up, but all else did not move.

“Three brown dots,” she called again, and tossed a scrap of dried venison to the pup.

And so it was, “Three Brown Dots” and the child became friends, keeping their distance, but knowing each other.

Many moons later as the child became a woman, her friend did not return one morning, and so after days, our people mourned the loss of our “Three Brown Dots.” As we told the story, the young woman looked into the sky and saw there in the southern sky, three twinkling brown stars. And soon she saw her friend, walking in the sky, looking down at her, tail curled.

And today you see Three Brown Dots walking.

See, just there.

And if you say the name, say the story.


In Memory of Our Three Brown Dots

three_brown_dots


Have you created your constellation? Or your story? Please join the 2014 Constellation Collaboration by

Kevin Hodson’s CLMOOC’s Constellation Collaboration