2 comments for “#clmooc

  1. Terry Cecil Elliott
    August 1, 2013 at 4:02 am

    I love how your badge ‘introduces’ you. That is a nice touch and shows how accessible you are. Now the #f5f is very deep rabbit hole that in many ways is the grand exemplar for the #clmooc. If someone had said to me during the planning stages that someone would post a crowdsourced Google presentation that aggregated a practice of celebrating five participants in the community—well, I would have thought that person a visionary or, more likely, a naive kook. This is a classic example of the unknown unknown, the inevitable product of complex systems. As such it proves the point (by now obvious in #clmooc) that you cannot manage complexity. All you can do is allow for it and even that is a dicey business. I think we allowed for it by making sure we kept the initial conditions relatively simple: go here/think about this/ make this/or do what you want/or not. The catalyst for fanning those conditions into a serviceable fire and then a big fat forge was the community. Sadly, #clmooc is likely a one-shot deal that will never be replicated. Gladly, it will probably be done better by another community somewhere else. Heraclitus was famous for his theory of flux that was summed up this way: you cannot step twice into the same stream. I am not disheartened by this, I am only continually surprised by it like a child playing peekaboo. Some people say more cowbell; I say more peekaboo. Thanks for playing peeka-mooc all summer, Sheri.

    • August 2, 2013 at 3:53 pm

      Thank you so much Terry. It has been a fantastic journey, hasn’t it? Although this may not be replicated, it will be remixed many times, I hope. And if we peekaboo around a few, there will be those that succeed in recreating the atmosphere of positive energy, enthusiasm, and hopefulness, which will show in the resulting “makes” and “connections” from that remix. We all were that spring below the pond, bubbling up and rippling out to spread fresh ideas and options. If we weren’t so accountable with time, if we allowed learners and guides the time, I think more of this would occur. It takes time to build the relationships that allow for such learning as this. And I believe this group of facilitators, whose hope for the future envisioned an idea, yet allowed for the possibles, took the time to plan and encourage their learners to join in. Just join in. I’m glad for the experience, and hope to carry through with the energy. Thanks again, Terry. I know we’ll meet again. (Now you’ll have more time to fix that tractor.)

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